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See also: intolérant

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French intolérant.

AdjectiveEdit

intolerant (comparative more intolerant, superlative most intolerant)

  1. Unable or indisposed to tolerate, endure or bear.
    I am lactose-intolerant, so I can't drink milk.
    • 2013, Sarah Taylor, Vegetarian to Vegan: Give Up Dairy, Give Up Eggs for Good
      When our bodies no longer create the enzyme needed to break down lactose, we can become intolerant to it.
    • 1892, Harry Marshall Ward, The Oak: A Popular Introduction to Forest-botany
      The oak, as is well known, is a slow-growing, dicotyledonous tree of peculiar spreading habit, and very intolerant of shade.
    • 1751, John Arbuthnot, An Essay Concerning the Effects of Air on Human Bodies
      The powers of human bodies being limited and intolerant of excesses.
  2. Not tolerant; close-minded about new or different ideas; indisposed to tolerate contrary opinions or beliefs; impatient of dissent or opposition; denying or refusing the right of private opinion or choice in others; inclined to persecute or suppress dissent.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

intolerant (plural intolerants)

  1. One who is intolerant; a bigot.
    • 1856, John David Chambers, Strictures, legal and historical, on the judgment of the Consistory Court of London, in December, 1855, in the Case of Westerton Versus Liddell
      [] a portion of the prejudice which darkened the spirits of these intolerants, might perhaps have cast its shadow over him.

ReferencesEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin intolerans.

AdjectiveEdit

intolerant (masculine and feminine plural intolerants)

  1. intolerant
    Antonym: tolerant

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ant

AdjectiveEdit

intolerant (comparative intoleranter, superlative am intolerantesten)

  1. intolerant

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit