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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French inviolable, from Latin inviolābilis (untouchable), from violō (violate).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈvaɪələbl̩/
  • Hyphenation: in‧vi‧o‧la‧ble

AdjectiveEdit

inviolable (comparative more inviolable, superlative most inviolable)

  1. Not violable; not to be infringed.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book IV”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker [] [a]nd by Robert Boulter [] [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      , lines 842–4:
      But come, for thou, be ſure, ſhalt give account / To him who ſent us, whoſe charge is to keep / This place inviolable, and therefore theſe from harm.
    • a. 1682, Sir Thomas Browne, “Christian Morals”, in Henry Gardiner, editor, Religio Medici, together with a Letter to a Friend on the Death of His Intimate Friend and Christian Morals, London: W. Pickering, published 1845, part III, page 337:
      But honeſt men’s words are Stygian oaths, and promiſes inviolable.
    • 1828, Thomas Castaly, “The Recorder”, in Fanny with Other Poems, page 87:
      One more request, and I am lost, / If you its earnest prayer deny ; / It is, that you preserve the most / Inviolable secrecy / As to my plan.
  2. Not susceptible to violence, or of being profaned, corrupted, or dishonoured.
  3. Incapable of being injured or invaded; indestructible.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin inviolābilis (untouchable).

AdjectiveEdit

inviolable (plural inviolables)

  1. inviolable

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin inviolābilis (untouchable).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /imbjoˈlable/, [ĩmbjoˈlaβle]

AdjectiveEdit

inviolable (plural inviolables)

  1. inviolable