irritation

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French irritation, from Latin irrītātiō, from irrītāre, present active infinitive of irrītō (I excite)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌɪɹɪˈteɪʃən/
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən
  • (file)

NounEdit

irritation (countable and uncountable, plural irritations)

  1. The act of irritating or annoying
    What irritation causes you to be so moody?
  2. The state of being irritated
    • 2012 March-April, Anna Lena Phillips, “Sneaky Silk Moths”, in American Scientist[1], volume 100, number 2, page 172:
      Last spring, the periodical cicadas emerged across eastern North America. Their vast numbers and short above-ground life spans inspired awe and irritation in humans—and made for good meals for birds and small mammals.
  3. A things or person that annoys
    Synonym: pain in the neck
  4. (physiology) a state of inflammation or painful reaction to allergy or cell-lining damage.
  5. A condition of morbid excitability or oversensitiveness of an organ or part of the body; a state in which the application of ordinary stimuli produces pain or excessive or vitiated action.
    • 1975, Richard I. Feinbloom, ‎Children's Hospital Medical Center , Child Health Encyclopedia: The Complete Guide for Parents
      Hip pain is a common complaint in children and may indicate a very mild irritation in the hip joint or may be the symptom of a very severe abnormality

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

  irritation on Wikipedia.Wikipedia


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin irrītātiō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

irritation f (plural irritations)

  1. irritation (all senses)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit