EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Turkish isot, from ısı (heat) + ot (grass).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

isot (uncountable)

  1. urfa biber (pepper variety)
    • 2015 October 6, Engin Akin, Essential Turkish Cuisine[1], Abrams, →ISBN, page 28:
      The best time to dry isot in Urfa is between September and November when the sun is less hot.
    • 2017 May 12, Mehmet Kemal; Sevgi Kolayli; Şengül Alpay Karaoğlu; Nimet Baltaş, “The Role of Spices in the Treatment of Heliobacter Pylori”, in Abstract Book of I. International Congress of Medical and Aromatic Plants: "Natural and Healthy Life"[2], →ISBN, page 1100:
      For this purpose, inhibitory effects on the Helicobacter pylori urease of ethanolic extracts of spices such as thyme, clove, isot pepper, turmeric, mint, black sesame and cinnamon purchased from herbalist were investigated as a screening study.
    • 2017 October 10, Robyn Eckhardt, Istanbul and Beyond: Exploring the Diverse Cuisines of Turkey[3], Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, →ISBN, page 210:
      Şanlıurfa was a hub for the barter of sheep and goats into and out of the Middle East; its famed isot pepper was an import from present-day Syria.

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

isot

  1. Nominative plural form of iso.

AnagramsEdit