See also: , , -ið, and íð

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From i +‎ -th.

Alternative formsEdit

  • ith
  • Sometimes written as i'th or i-th

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ith (not comparable)

  1. (mathematics) Occurring at position i in a sequence.
Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Pitman ess and ish, which it is related to phonetically and graphically, and the sound it represents.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ith (plural iths)

  1. The letter ⟨(⟩, which stands for the th sound (/θ/) in Pitman shorthand.
Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *its, from Proto-Indo-European *eǵʰs (from, out of). Related to Lithuanian ìš, Latvian iz and Old Prussian is. The change in meaning is a part of the wider sematic shift of prepositions (see nga); the old meaning is preserved in the prefix sh- (partially influenced by a homonymous prefix of Latin origin continuing Latin dis-).[1]

AdverbEdit

ith

  1. (obsolete) behind

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998) , “ith”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Cologne: Brill, →ISBN, page 154

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish ithid (eats, bites, devours; grazes), from Proto-Celtic *ɸiteti, from Proto-Indo-European *peyt-. The future stem is from Old Irish ·íss, from Proto-Celtic *ɸiɸitsāti.

The occasional Munster past tense form duaidh is from Old Irish ·dúaid (deuterotonic do·fúaid), from dí- + fo- + Proto-Celtic *ed-, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ed-.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ith (present analytic itheann, future analytic íosfaidh, verbal noun ithe, past participle ite)

  1. eat

ConjugationEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ith n-ith hith not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • "ith" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “ithid”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Finck, F. N. (1899), Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 136.
  • Holmer, Nils M. (1962). The Dialects of Co. Clare, part I. Dublin: Royal Irish Academy, p. 151.
  • Ó Buachalla, Breandán (2003). An Teanga Bheo: Gaeilge Chléire. Dublin: Institiúid Teangeolaíochta Éireann, →ISBN, p. 82.

Old IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Celtic *ɸitu, from Proto-Indo-European *peyt- (food, nutrition); from the root of ithid (to eat). Cognate with Welsh ŷd.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ith n (genitive etho, no plural)

  1. corn, grain
DeclensionEdit
Neuter u-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative ithN
Vocative ithN
Accusative ithN
Genitive ethoH, athoH
Dative ithL
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
DescendantsEdit
  • Irish: ioth

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ith

  1. second-person singular imperative of ithid

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ith unchanged n-ith
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish ithid (eats, bites, devours; grazes), from Proto-Celtic *ɸiteti, from Proto-Indo-European *peyt-.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ith (past dh'ith, future ithidh, verbal noun ithe, past participle ithte)

  1. eat
    Ith do leòr!Bon appetit!
    Ith, òl agus bi subhach!Eat, drink, and be merry!

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ith” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “ithid”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language