EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ythe, ithe, uthe, from Old English ȳþ (wave, billow, flood, sea, liquid, water), from Proto-West Germanic [Term?], from Proto-Germanic *unþiz, *unþī (wave), from Proto-Indo-European *unt-, *und- (wave). Cognate with German Unde (flood, wave), Icelandic unnur (wave).

NounEdit

ithe (plural ithes)

  1. (archaic) A wave.
  2. (obsolete, in the plural) Waves; the sea.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English ithen, related to Old Norse iðja (to be active, do, perform). This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

VerbEdit

ithe (third-person singular simple present ithes, present participle ithing, simple past and past participle ithed)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To thrive; flourish; prosper.
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ithe

  1. inflection of ith:
    1. present subjunctive analytic
    2. (obsolete) second-person singular present indicative

NounEdit

ithe m (genitive singular ite)

  1. verbal noun of ith
  2. eating

DeclensionEdit

(as verbal noun):

(as regular noun):

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ithe n-ithe hithe t-ithe
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

KikuyuEdit

PronunciationEdit

As for Tonal Class, Benson (1964) classifies this term into Class 2 with a disyllabic stem, together with kĩgunyũ, njagĩ, kiugũ, and so on.
  • (Kiambu)

NounEdit

ithe 1

  1. his or her father

Derived termsEdit

(Proverbs)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Yukawa, Yasutoshi (1981). "A Tentative Tonal Analysis of Kikuyu Nouns: A Study of Limuru Dialect." In Journal of Asian and African Studies, No. 22, 75–123.
  • “ithe” in Benson, T.G. (1964). Kikuyu-English dictionary, p. 192. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

ithe

  1. Alternative form of ythe

Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ithe f

  1. verbal noun of ithid
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 102a15
      Itius anúas ⁊ dus·claid anís; air ní foircnea in fíni hithe neich di anúas, amal du·ngní int aís sechmaill as·mbeir-som .i. air is cuit adaill ad·n-ellat-sidi in fíni du thabairt neich doib dia thorud.
      They eat it from above and he roots it up from below; for it does not exterminate the vine to eat of anything of it from above, as do the passers-by whom he speaks of, i.e. for it is only a passing visit that they make [lit: ‘that they visit’] to the vine to take something for themselves of its fruit.

InflectionEdit

Feminine iā-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative itheL ithiL ithi
Vocative itheL ithiL ithi
Accusative ithiN ithiL ithi
Genitive ithe itheL itheN
Dative ithiL ithib ithib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ithe unchanged n-ithe
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Scottish GaelicEdit

NounEdit

ithe f

  1. (act of) eating