IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ithid

  1. (archaic, Munster) third-person plural present indicative/subjunctive of ith

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ithid n-ithid hithid not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Middle IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish ithid.

PronunciationEdit

  • (earlier) IPA(key): /ˈiθʲiðʲ/
  • (later) IPA(key): /ˈihʲiɣʲ/

VerbEdit

ithid (verbal noun ithe)

  1. to eat
    • c. 1000, Anonymous; published in (1935) , Rudolf Thurneysen, editor, Scéla Mucca Meic Dathó, Dublin: Staionery Office, § 1, l. 14, page 2: “In fer no·t⟨h⟩ēged iarsint ṡligi do·bered in n-aēl isin coiri, ocus a·taibred din chētgabāil, iss ed no·ithed. [Each man who came along the passage would put the flesh-fork into the cauldron, and whatever he got at the first taking, it was that which he ate. (literally, The man who…)]”

ConjugationEdit

  • Third-person singular imperfect indicative: ·ithed

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: ith
  • Manx: ee
  • Scottish Gaelic: ith

MutationEdit

Middle Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ithid unchanged n-ithid
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

A suppletive verb.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ithid (verbal noun ithe)

  1. to eat
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 102a15
      Itius anúas ⁊ dus·claid anís; air ní foircnea in fíni hithe neich di anúas, amal du·ngní int aīs sechmaill as·mbeir-som .i. air is cuit adaill ad·n-ellat-sidi in fíni du thabairt neich doib dia thorud.
      They eat it from above and he roots it up from below; for it does not exterminate the vine to eat of anything of it from above, as do the passers-by whom he speaks of, i.e. for it is only a passing visit that they make [lit: ‘that they visit’] to the vine to take something for themselves of its fruit.

ConjugationEdit

DescendantsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ithid unchanged n-ithid
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.