ius

Contents

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PIE root
*h₂yew-

From Proto-Italic *jowos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yew-, an extended form of the root *h₂ey- (the source of aevum and iuvenis).

NounEdit

iūs n ‎(genitive iūris); third declension

  1. law, right, duty
    Jus summum saepe summa est malitia (The highest law is often the greatest roguery) — Terence Heautontimorumenos 4.5.43 (translation Benham's Book of Quotations 1948)
  2. court of law
InflectionEdit

Third declension neuter.

Case Singular Plural
nominative iūs iūra
genitive iūris iūrum
dative iūrī iūribus
accusative iūs iūra
ablative iūre iūribus
vocative iūs iūra
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Indo-European *yows-, from *yew- ‎(to mix (of meal preparation)). Cognate with Ancient Greek ζῦθος ‎(zûthos), ζύμη ‎(zúmē), ζωμός ‎(zōmós), Proto-Germanic *justaz (whence Old Norse ostr), Proto-Slavic *juxa (whence Polish jucha, Russian уха ‎(uxa)).

NounEdit

iūs n ‎(genitive iūris); third declension

  1. gravy
  2. broth
  3. sauce
InflectionEdit

Third declension neuter.

Case Singular Plural
nominative iūs iūra
genitive iūris iūrum
dative iūrī iūribus
accusative iūs iūra
ablative iūre iūribus
vocative iūs iūra
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ius” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to have become independent, be no longer a minor: sui iuris factum esse
    • to teach some one letters: erudire aliquem artibus, litteris (but erudire aliquem in iure civili, in re militari)
    • to grant a people its independence: populum liberum esse, libertate uti, sui iuris esse pati
    • to administer justice (said of the praetor): ius dicere
    • to administer justice (said of the praetor): ius reddere (Liv. 3. 33)
    • to assert one's right: ius suum persequi
    • to obtain justice: ius suum adipisci (Liv. 1. 32. 10)
    • to maintain one's right: ius suum tenere, obtinere
    • to waive one's right: de iure suo decedere or cedere
    • to go to law with a person: (ex) iure, lege agere cum aliquo
    • to proceed against some one with the utmost rigour of the law; to strain the law in one's favour: summo iure agere cum aliquo (cf. summum ius, summa iniuria)
    • to summon some one before the court: in ius, in iudicium vocare aliquem
    • a sound judicial system: aequa iuris descriptio (Off. 2. 4. 15)
    • to live with some one on an equal footing: aequo iure vivere cum aliquo
    • to reduce law to a system: ius ad artem redigere
    • absence of justice: ius nullum
    • to trample all law under foot: ius ac fas omne delere
    • against all law, human and divine: contra ius fasque
    • with full right: optimo iure
    • prerogative, privilege: ius praecipuum, beneficium, donum, also immunitas c. Gen.
    • to violate the law of nations: ius gentium violare
    • quite rightly: et recte (iure, merito)
    • quite rightly: et recte (iure) quidem
    • quite rightly: recte, iure id quidem
    • with perfect right: meo (tuo, suo) iure
    • with perfect right: iusto iure
    • legitimately; with the fullest right: optimo iure (cf. summo iure, sect. XV. 1).
    • (ambiguous) to give the state a constitution: civitati leges, iudicia, iura describere
    • (ambiguous) anarchy reigns supreme: omnia divina humanaque iura permiscentur (B. C. 1. 6. 8)
    • (ambiguous) to trample all law under foot: omnia iura pervertere
  • Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), volume II, Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page 507
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