EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dʒæb/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æb

NounEdit

jab (plural jabs)

  1. A quick stab or blow; a poking or thrusting motion.
  2. (boxing) A short straight punch.
    • 2011 December 18, Ben Dirs, “Carl Froch outclassed by dazzling Andre Ward”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      American Ward was too quick and too slick for his British rival, landing at will with razor sharp jabs and hooks and even bullying Froch at times.
  3. (Britain) A medical injection.
    Our dog was exposed to rabies, so the whole family went to a clinic to get our jabs.
  4. (Britain) A vaccination, whether or not delivered via conventional injection.
    • 2017 June 28, Michelle Roberts, “Painless flu jab patch for people scared of injections”, in BBC News[2]:
      A 'painless' sticking plaster flu jab that delivers vaccine into the skin has passed important safety tests in the first trial in people.
  5. (US, figuratively) A verbal annoyance.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

jab (third-person singular simple present jabs, present participle jabbing, simple past and past participle jabbed)

  1. To poke or thrust abruptly, or to make such a motion.
  2. To deliver a quick punch.
  3. (slang, Britain) To give someone an injection

TranslationsEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English job.

NounEdit

jab m (genitive singular jab, nominative plural jabanna)

  1. job, piece of work
  2. post, employment

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English jab.

NounEdit

jab m (invariable)

  1. jab (boxing punch)

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

jab m (plural jabs)

  1. (boxing) jab