See also: Jung

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

jung (plural jungs)

  1. Alternative form of djong (type of sailing ship)

Alemannic GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German junc, from Old High German jung, from Proto-West Germanic *jung, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁n̥ḱós.

AdjectiveEdit

jung

  1. (Carcoforo) young

ReferencesEdit

  • “jung” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

CimbrianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German junc, from Old High German jung, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁n̥ḱós.

AdjectiveEdit

jung (comparative jüngor, superlative dar jüngorste)

  1. (Sette Comuni) young

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • “jung” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German junc, from Old High German jung, from Proto-West Germanic *jung, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁n̥ḱós. Compare Dutch jong, English young, Danish ung.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /jʊŋ/
  • (file)
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

jung (comparative jünger, superlative am jüngsten)

  1. young

DeclensionEdit

  • Colloquial, the neuter can also be junget besides junges, especially in Berlinian and Ruhrpottisch.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • jung” in Duden online

IndonesianEdit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

EtymologyEdit

From Chinese Teochew (zung5, “watercraft; vessel”).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈd͡ʒʊŋ]
  • Hyphenation: jung

NounEdit

jung (first-person possessive jungku, second-person possessive jungmu, third-person possessive jungnya)

  1. junk: a Chinese sailing vessel.

Further readingEdit


Iu MienEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Hmong-Mien *-roŋ, from Chinese (OC *[mə]-roŋ) (B-S). Cognate with White Hmong zaj and Western Xiangxi Miao [Fenghuang] ronf.

NounEdit

jung 

  1. dragon

Khumi ChinEdit

 
Jung.

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Kuki-Chin *yuu, from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *b-yuw (rat, rabbit, hare). Doublet of bäjö. Cognates include Burmese ယုန် (yun) and S'gaw Karen ယုၢ် (yu̱).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jung

  1. rabbit

ReferencesEdit

  • K. E. Herr (2011) The phonological interpretation of minor syllables, applied to Lemi Chin[1], Payap University, page 45

LashiEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jung

  1. school

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[2], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis), page 18

Low GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German and Old Saxon jung, from Proto-West Germanic *jung, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁n̥ḱós. Compare German jung, Dutch jong, English young, Danish ung.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

jung (comparative jünger, superlative jüngst)

  1. young

DeclensionEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

jung

  1. (chiefly Early Middle English) Alternative form of yong

MòchenoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German junc, from Old High German jung, from Proto-West Germanic *jung, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁n̥ḱós. Cognate with German jung, English young.

AdjectiveEdit

jung

  1. young

ReferencesEdit

  • “jung” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *jung, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁n̥ḱós.

AdjectiveEdit

jung

  1. young

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Derksen, Rick (2008) Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 4), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 208. →ISBN

Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *jung, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, contracted form of an earlier *juwungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *yuwn̥kós from *h₂yuh₁en-. Cognate with Old Frisian jung, Old English ġeong, Dutch jong, Middle High German junc (German jung), Old Norse ungr (Swedish ung), Gothic 𐌾𐌿𐌲𐌲𐍃 (juggs); and with Latin iuvencus (young bull), Old Irish oac (young), Russian юный (junyj, youthful).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

jung (comparative jungoro, superlative jungost)

  1. young

DeclensionEdit




DescendantsEdit


VilamovianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German jung, from Proto-West Germanic *jung, from Proto-Germanic *jungaz, contracted form of an earlier *juwungaz, from Proto-Indo-European *yuwn̥kós from *h₂yuh₁en-. Cognate with Old Frisian jung, Old English ġeong, Dutch jong, Old High German jung (German jung), Old Norse ungr (Swedish ung), Gothic 𐌾𐌿𐌲𐌲𐍃 (juggs); and with Latin iuvencus (young bull), Old Irish oac (young), Russian юный (junyj, youthful).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

jung

  1. young

AntonymsEdit