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See also: Junior, júnior, and iunior

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin junior, a contraction of iuvenior (younger) which is the comparative of iuvenis (young); see juvenile.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

junior (not generally comparable, comparative more junior, superlative most junior)

  1. (comparable) Low in rank; having a subordinate role, job, or situation.
  2. (not comparable, often preceded by a possessive adjective or a possessive form of a noun) Younger.
    • 2003, Karen Frisch, Creating Junior Genealogists, →ISBN:
      Far less likely to intimidate your junior genealogist is the Internet, with its databases, message and bulletin boards, online collections, and more. Now is also the time to introduce your children to older relatives, who can be valuable resources and provide precious information.
    • 2010, Julie Cross, Humor in Contemporary Junior Literature, →ISBN, page 1:
      Humorous books for junior readers are often ignored by the critical community, due, in part, to what Milner Davis describes as a “conventional bias against comic genres” (1996: 101), and I consider this a serious oversight within the field of children's literature.
    • 2011, Julian Barnes, Knowing French (Storycuts), →ISBN:
      There she is: Lady Margaret Hall, eight years junior to me, exhibitioner where I was top scholar, and reading French. (Not veterinary science.)
    • 2012, Junior Golf in Pictures: The Junior Golfer's Handbook, →ISBN:
      A handbook for junior golfers covering a wide range of golfing instruction and information with over 250 photographs of juniors learning, playing, practicing and enjoying the game of golf.
    • 2013, Krishna Mohan Mishra, Me and Medicine, →ISBN, page 111:
      Instead of going to the unit I walked in the opposite direction towards the medicine lecture room with various thoughts going through my mind — most of them were positive as this was a great opportunity to practise what I had learnt so far and should have a good impact on students who were 3–4 years junior to me and not known to me.
  3. (not comparable) Belonging to a younger person, or an earlier time of life.
    • Sir Thomas Browne
      Though our first Studies and junior Endeavours may stile us Peripateticks, Stoicks, or Academicks, yet I perceive the wisest Heads prove at last, almost all Scepticks []
  4. (not comparable, chiefly US) Of or pertaining to a third academic year in a four-year high school (eleventh grade) or university.

Alternative formsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

junior (plural juniors)

  1. A younger person.
    four years his junior
    • Angela Brazil
      Miss Mitchell would certainly be most relieved to have a monitress who was capable of organising the juniors at games.
    • 1939 P. G. Wodehouse, "Uncle Fred in the Springtime":
      The last man I met who was at school with me, though some years my junior, had a long white beard and no teeth.
  2. A name suffix used after a son's name when his father has the same name (abbreviations: Jnr., Jr., Jun.).
  3. (chiefly US) A third-year student at a high school or university.
  4. (law) A junior barrister.

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • junior at OneLook Dictionary Search

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin junior, juniorem; Doublet of geindre. Cf. also the inherited Old French oblique case gignor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

junior m or f (plural juniors)

  1. (sports) junior

AdjectiveEdit

junior (plural juniors)

  1. junior (all senses)

See alsoEdit


HungarianEdit

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

jūnior (neuter jūnius); third declension

  1. Alternative form of iūnior

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension comparative adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative jūnior jūnius jūniōrēs jūniōra
Genitive jūniōris jūniōrum
Dative jūniōrī jūniōribus
Accusative jūniōrem jūnius jūniōrēs jūniōra
Ablative jūniōre jūniōribus
Vocative jūnior jūnius jūniōrēs jūniōra

ReferencesEdit