Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Originally a past participle of kemb, from Middle English kemben, from Old English cemban(to comb). Modern uses are back-formations from the negative unkempt. More at kemb.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

kempt

  1. neat and tidy; especially used of hair

Usage notesEdit

Less common than unkempt. Often used in compound well-kempt or phrase “well kempt”, which may be criticized as redundant; compare well-groomed, well-kept.

SynonymsEdit