English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English kinken, kynken, from Old English *cincian (attested in cincung), from Proto-West Germanic *kinkōn, from Proto-Germanic *kinkōną (to laugh), from Proto-Indo-European *gang- (to mock, jeer, deride), related to Old English canc (jeering, scorn, derision). Cognate with Dutch kinken (to kink, cough).

Alternative forms

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Verb

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kink (third-person singular simple present kinks, present participle kinking, simple past and past participle kinked)

  1. To laugh loudly.
  2. To gasp for breath as in a severe fit of coughing.

Noun

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kink (plural kinks)

  1. (Scotland, dialect) A convulsive fit of coughing or laughter; a sonorous indraft of breath; a whoop; a gasp of breath caused by laughing, coughing, or crying.

Etymology 2

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From Dutch kink (a twist or curl in a rope),[1] from Proto-Germanic *kenk-, *keng- (to bend, turn), from Proto-Indo-European *gengʰ- (to turn, wind, braid, weave). Compare Middle Low German kinke (spiral screw, coil), Old Norse kikna (to bend backwards, sink at the knee), Icelandic kengur (a bend or bight; a metal crook). Probably related to kick.

Alternative forms

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Noun

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kink (countable and uncountable, plural kinks)

  1. A tight curl, twist, or bend in a length of thin material, hair etc.
    We couldn't get enough water to put out the fire because of a kink in the hose.
  2. A difficulty or flaw that is likely to impede operation, as in a plan or system.
    They had planned to open another shop downtown, but their plan had a few kinks.
  3. An unreasonable notion; a crotchet; a whim; a caprice.
    • 1856, Frederick Swartwout Cozzens, The Sparrowgrass Papers:
      Never a Yankee was born or bred / Without that peculiar kink in his head / By which he could turn the smallest amount / Of whatever he had to the best account.
  4. (informal, countable or uncountable) Peculiarity or deviation in sexual behaviour or taste.
    • 2013, Alison Tyler, H Is for Hardcore, page 13:
      To top it all off, Lynn is into kink. Last night she was really into kink. It's a good thing that today is my day off because I need the time to recuperate and think things over.
  5. (informal, countable) A person with peculiar sexual tastes.
    Synonym: kinkster
    • 1985, John Dann MacDonald, Five Complete Travis McGee Novels, page 254:
      "What do they think you know?"
      "No more than I've told you. That he's a kink. He rapes people and kills people and spends too much money and flies grass in."
    • 2013, James Hadley Chase, A Can of Worms:
      “He's a kink. All I have to do is toss off my clothes and dance around his apartment while he sits and drools.”
  6. (mathematics) A positive 1-soliton solution to the sine-Gordon equation.
Antonyms
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Derived terms
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Translations
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See also
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Verb

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kink (third-person singular simple present kinks, present participle kinking, simple past and past participle kinked)

  1. (transitive) To form a kink or twist.
  2. (intransitive) To be formed into a kink or twist.
Derived terms
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Translations
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References

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  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2024) “kink”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

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Dutch

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Etymology

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From Middle Dutch *kinc.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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kink f (plural kinken, diminutive kinkje n)

  1. kink (curl, twist, or bend)
    Er zat een kink in de kabel.
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Papiamentu: kènk, kenku

Estonian

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Etymology 1

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From Low German schenke.

Noun

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kink (genitive kingi, partitive kinki)

  1. gift
  2. favour/favor
Inflection
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Declension of kink (ÕS type 22e/riik, k-g gradation)
singular plural
nominative kink kingid
accusative nom.
gen. kingi
genitive kinkide
partitive kinki kinke
kinkisid
illative kinki
kingisse
kinkidesse
kingesse
inessive kingis kinkides
kinges
elative kingist kinkidest
kingest
allative kingile kinkidele
kingele
adessive kingil kinkidel
kingel
ablative kingilt kinkidelt
kingelt
translative kingiks kinkideks
kingeks
terminative kingini kinkideni
essive kingina kinkidena
abessive kingita kinkideta
comitative kingiga kinkidega
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.) Cognate to dialectal Finnish kenkku.

Noun

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kink (genitive kingu, partitive kinku)

  1. small mound, knoll
Inflection
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Declension of kink (ÕS type 22e/riik, k-g gradation)
singular plural
nominative kink kingud
accusative nom.
gen. kingu
genitive kinkude
partitive kinku kinke
kinkusid
illative kinku
kingusse
kinkudesse
kingesse
inessive kingus kinkudes
kinges
elative kingust kinkudest
kingest
allative kingule kinkudele
kingele
adessive kingul kinkudel
kingel
ablative kingult kinkudelt
kingelt
translative kinguks kinkudeks
kingeks
terminative kinguni kinkudeni
essive kinguna kinkudena
abessive kinguta kinkudeta
comitative kinguga kinkudega
Derived terms
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Hungarian

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Etymology

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From ki (who) +‎ -nk (our, of ours, possessive suffix).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈkiŋk]
  • Hyphenation: kink

Pronoun

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kink

  1. first-person plural single-possession possessive of ki

Declension

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Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative kink
accusative kinket
dative kinknek
instrumental kinkkel
causal-final kinkért
translative kinkké
terminative kinkig
essive-formal kinkként
essive-modal
inessive kinkben
superessive kinken
adessive kinknél
illative kinkbe
sublative kinkre
allative kinkhez
elative kinkből
delative kinkről
ablative kinktől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
kinké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
kinkéi

Yola

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Etymology

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A nasal form from Middle English kyken. Compare also robunkshough (roebuck forest).

Pronunciation

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Verb

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kink (simple past kinket)

  1. to toss or trip, kick

References

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  • Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828) William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867, page 50