See also: laïc

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French laïque, from Latin laĭcus (common people), from Ancient Greek λαός (laós). Doublet of lay.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

laic (plural laics)

  1. A layperson, as opposed to a member of the clergy.

AdjectiveEdit

laic (comparative more laic, superlative most laic)

  1. Lay, relating to laypersons, as opposed to clerical.
    • 1644, John Milton, Aeropagitica
      And in conclusion it reflects to the disrepute of our ministers ... [that] they should still be frequented with such an unprincipled, unedified and laic rabble, as that the whiff of every new pamphlet should stagger them out of their catechism and Christian walking.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin laĭcus (common people), from Ancient Greek λαός (laós). Doublet of llec.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

laic (feminine laica, masculine plural laics, feminine plural laiques)

  1. laic, secular

NounEdit

laic m (plural laics, feminine laica)

  1. layperson

Further readingEdit


Iu MienEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Hmong-Mien *-rajH (sharp). Cognate with White Hmong zuag.

AdjectiveEdit

laic 

  1. sharp