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Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin laxō, laxāre (to relax, loosen); also possibly partly from or influenced by Old High German lāzan (to let, let go, leave) (German lassen), from Proto-Germanic *lētaną (to let, leave, leave alone), from Proto-Indo-European *leh₁d- (to let go). There was also an Old French verb laiier, with the same meaning and sometimes considered a variant form, which may have come instead from Frankish *laibjan.

VerbEdit

laissier

  1. to allow; to permit
  2. to leave (not prohibit)

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -ier, with a palatal stem. These verbs are conjugated mostly like verbs in -er, but there is an extra i before the e of some endings. The forms that would normally end in *-ss, *-sss, *-sst are modified to s, s, st. This verb has irregularities in its conjugation. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

See alsoEdit

DescendantsEdit


PicardEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French laissier, from Latin laxō, laxāre (to relax, loosen); partly from or influenced by Old High German lāzan (to let, let go, leave) (German lassen), from Proto-Germanic *lētaną (to let, leave, leave alone), from Proto-Indo-European *leh₁d- (to leave, let). Conflated also with Old French laiier (to leave, abandon, allow) (compare Old Occitan laihar, laiar, Old Northern Italian lagare), also of Germanic origin, from Gothic 𐌻𐌰𐌲𐌾𐌰𐌽 (lagjan, to lay, let lie, leave), from Proto-Germanic *lagjaną (to lay). More at let, lay.

VerbEdit

laissier

  1. to let, to leave
    I feut laissier ches vakes din'ch prè.
    You have to let the cows in the field.
  2. to leave alone
  3. to leave with, to give
  4. to let, to allow
    Laisse-les foaire !
    Let them do !
  5. (reflexive, ès laissier) to allow oneself, to let oneself

ConjugationEdit