See also: lápis

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Shortened form of lapis lazuli.

NounEdit

lapis (uncountable)

  1. (rare) Lapis lazuli.
    • 1735, [John Barrow], “ENGRAVING”, in Dictionarium Polygraphicum: Or, The Whole Body of Arts Regularly Digested. [...], volume I (A–H), London: [] C[harles] Hitch and C[harles] Davis [], and S[amuel] Austen [], OCLC 987025732:
      Lapis, opal, &c. are poliſh'd on a wooden wheel. To faſhion and Engrave vaſes of agate, cryſtal, lapis, or the like, they make uſe of a kind of lathe like that us'd by pewterers, excepting that as the pewterers lathe holds the veſſels, which are to be wrought with proper tools; that of the Engraver generally holds the tools which are turn'd by a wheel, and the veſſels held to them to be cut and engraven either in relievo or otherwiſe; [...]
    • 1923 (reprinted 1993), Franklin Simon Fashion Catalog for 1923 (Franklin Simon & Co, New York), item number 53:
      French Bead Necklace of lapis or carnelian color, with crystal rondelles between each bead, graduated, 32 inches long.
    • 2010, Irene Winter (ed.), On Art in the Ancient Near East: From the Third Millennium B.C.E., page 291:
      That lapis lazuli in particular among the precious and semi-precious stones known from Mesopotamia was accorded considerable value in antiquity may be inferred from the archaeological record through association with high-status locii and goods. [...] deities receive votive gifts and booty of lapis, consisting of items of personal adornment and cult objects, while their temples are described as decorated with lapis or shining like lapis. [...] For example, the contents of the graves in the Royal Cemetery of Ur: [...] various objects employing inlay that include lapis among the insets, [...] Mari sent an emissary to acquire lapis from Lars.
    • 2011, Daniel Boscaljon, Hope and the Longing for Utopia: Futures and Illusions in Theology and Narrative, page 99:
      The buddha lands described in the Lotus share certain generic features: the ground is made of lapis or crystal; they are perfectly level, without mountains or valleys; they are free from all manner of filth, including the stench of latrines [...] The ground was made of lapis lazuli, [...]

Usage notesEdit

  • In translations of Indian mythological texts, a plural form lapises can be found.

AnagramsEdit



Bikol CentralEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish lápiz (pencil).

NounEdit

lapis

  1. pencil

BolinaoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish lápiz (pencil).

NounEdit

lapis

  1. pencil

CebuanoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: la‧pis

Etymology 1Edit

Unknown.

NounEdit

lapis

  1. the doublespotted queenfish (Scomberoides lysan)

Etymology 2Edit

From Spanish lápiz (pencil), from Latin lapis (stone).

NounEdit

lapis

  1. a pencil

CuyunonEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish lápiz (pencil).

NounEdit

lapis

  1. pencil

IndonesianEdit

NounEdit

lapis (plural, first-person possessive lapisku, second-person possessive lapismu, third-person possessive lapisnya)

  1. layer, lining
  2. row
  3. stratum

AdjectiveEdit

lapis

  1. in layers

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin lapis. Doublet of lapide.

NounEdit

lapis m (invariable)

  1. pencil
    Synonym: matita
  2. sanguine (red chalk)
    Synonym: sanguigna

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Catalan: llapis
  • Galician: lapis
  • Maltese: lapes
  • Portuguese: lápis
  • Spanish: lápiz

AnagramsEdit


KavalanEdit

NounEdit

lapis

  1. squirrel

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

May be connected with Ancient Greek λέπας (lépas, bare rock, crag), from Proto-Indo-European *lep- (to peel). Confer with saxum - secō, rupēs - rumpō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lapis m (genitive lapidis); third declension

  1. a stone
    • 405, Jerome and others, Vulgate, Genesis 28:22
      et lapis iste quem erexi in titulum vocabitur Domus Dei
      And this stone, which I have set for a pillar, shall be God's house
  2. a milestone
  3. a boundary stone
  4. gravestone, tombstone
  5. lapis manalis ("stone of manes"), which covers the gate of Hades or underworld
  6. a stone platform at a slave auction
  7. a statue
  8. (poetic) jewel, precious stone

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative lapis lapidēs
Genitive lapidis lapidum
Dative lapidī lapidibus
Accusative lapidem lapidēs
Ablative lapide lapidibus
Vocative lapis lapidēs

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Limos KalingaEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish lápiz (pencil).

NounEdit

lapis

  1. pencil

Lubuagan KalingaEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish lápiz (pencil).

NounEdit

lapis

  1. pencil

MasbatenyoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish lápiz (pencil).

NounEdit

lapis

  1. pencil

Matigsalug ManoboEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish lápiz (pencil).

NounEdit

lapis

  1. pencil

TagabawaEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish lápiz (pencil).

NounEdit

lapis

  1. pencil

TagalogEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish lápiz (pencil), from Latin lapis.

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: lá‧pis
  • IPA(key): /ˈlapis/, [ˈlapɪs]

NounEdit

lápis

  1. pencil

TetumEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese lápis.

NounEdit

lapis

  1. pencil

Waray-WarayEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish lápiz (pencil).

NounEdit

lapis

  1. pencil

YogadEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish lápiz (pencil).

NounEdit

lapis

  1. pencil