Latin

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Etymology

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From the radical of the supine of ferō, lātum +‎ -tor.

Noun

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lātor m (genitive lātōris); third declension

  1. Someone who proposes a law, proposer, carrier.
    • 63 B.C.E., Cicero, In Catilinam, 4.5.10
      [] denique ipsum latorem Semproniae legis iniussu populi poenas rei publicae dependisse
      [] and moreover that the very proposer of the Sempronian law suffered punishment by the command of the people.

Declension

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Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative lātor lātōrēs
Genitive lātōris lātōrum
Dative lātōrī lātōribus
Accusative lātōrem lātōrēs
Ablative lātōre lātōribus
Vocative lātor lātōrēs

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Italian: latore

References

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  • lator”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • lator”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • lator in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • Carl Meißner, Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a legislator: qui leges scribit (not legum lator)

Old English

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Etymology

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Related to late.

Adverb

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lator (superlative latost)

  1. comparative degree of late; later
    • c. 992, Ælfric, "The Octaves and Circumcision of our Lord"
      Hwæt eac seo sǽ wunderlice geþwærlæcð þæs monan ymbrene; symle hí beoð geferan on wæstme and on wanunge. And swa swa se mona dæghwonlice feower pricon lator arist, swa eac seo sǽ symle feower pricum lator fleowð.
      The sea too agrees wonderfully with the course of the moon; they are always companions in their increase and waning. And as the moon rises daily four points later, so also the sea flows always four points later.
    • c. 992, Ælfric, "Of the Catholic Faith"
      Nis heora nán máre þonne oðer, ne nán læssa ðonne oðer; ne nán beforan oðrum, ne nán bæftan oðrum; forðan swa hwæt swa læsse bið þonne God, þæt ne bið na God; þæt þæt lator bið, þæt hæfð anginn, ac God næfð nán anginn.
      No one of them is greater than other, nor one less than other, nor one before other, nor one after other; for whatsoever is less than God, that is not God; that which is later has beginning, but God has no beginning.
  2. slowly

Synonyms

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