See also: Leese

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lesen, from Old English *lēosan (only attested in compounds: belēosan, forlēosan, etc.), from Proto-Germanic *leusaną (to lose), from Proto-Indo-European *lews- (to cut; sever; separate; loosen; lose).

VerbEdit

leese (third-person singular simple present leeses, present participle leesing, simple past lore or leesed, past participle lorn or leesed)

  1. (obsolete) To lose.
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, Sonnet 5:
      But flowers distill'd though they with winter meet,
      Leese but their show; their substance still lives sweet.
    • a. 1598, William Cecil, Advice to his son
      They would rather leese their friend than their jest.
    • 1579, Immeritô [pseudonym; Edmund Spenser], “September. Aegloga Nona.”, in The Shepheardes Calender: [], London: [] Hugh Singleton, [], OCLC 606515406; reprinted as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, The Shepheardes Calender [], London: John C. Nimmo, [], 1890, OCLC 890162479:
      Yet better leave off with a little losse,
      Then by much wrestling to leese the grosse

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English lesen, from Old English lȳsan, līesan (to let loose; release), from Proto-Germanic *lausijaną. Cognate with Dutch lozen, German lösen, Swedish lösa.

VerbEdit

leese (third-person singular simple present leeses, present participle leesing, simple past and past participle leesed)

  1. (obsolete) To release, set free.
  2. (obsolete) To loosen, unfasten.

Etymology 3Edit

Compare French léser, Latin laesus.

VerbEdit

leese

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To hurt.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ben Jonson to this entry?)