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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

lege (uncountable)

  1. (US, colloquial) Clipping of legislature.

Etymology 2Edit

Abbreviated from allege (to assert).

VerbEdit

lege (third-person singular simple present leges, present participle leging, simple past and past participle leged)

  1. (obsolete) To allege; to assert.
    • Bishop Fisher
      Not only he legeth his mercy to bind his reason, but also his wysdome.
    • Chaucer, Court of Love, v. 1065.
      To reson faste, and ledge auctoritie.

Etymology 3Edit

Clipping of legend.

NounEdit

lege (uncountable)

  1. (Ireland, slang) A legend; colloquially used to describe a person who is held in high regard.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse leika, from Proto-Germanic *laikaną, from Proto-Indo-European *leyg-.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lajə/, [ˈlɑjə], [ˈlɑːɪ]

VerbEdit

lege (imperative leg, infinitive at lege, present tense leger, past tense legede, perfect tense har leget)

  1. play
  2. spawn
Usage notesEdit

In compounds: "lege-".

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See leg.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lajə/, [ˈlɑjə], [ˈlɑːɪ]

NounEdit

lege c

  1. indefinite plural of leg

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eːɣə

VerbEdit

lege

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of legen

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

VerbEdit

lege

  1. First-person singular present of legen.
  2. Imperative singular of legen.
  3. First-person singular subjunctive I of legen.
  4. Third-person singular subjunctive I of legen.

InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

lege (plural leges)

  1. law

VerbEdit

lege

  1. present of leger
  2. imperative of leger

LadinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lex, legem.

NounEdit

lege m (plural leges)

  1. law

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lege

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of legō

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lēge

  1. ablative singular of lēx

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Late Latin leuca, leuga, from Proto-Celtic *lewgā.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlɛːɡ(ə)/, /ˈlɛu̯ɡ(ə)/, /ˈlɛːk(ə)/

NounEdit

lege (plural leges)

  1. league (unit of meaurement)
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman lige, liege; further etymology is disputed.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈleːdʒ(ə)/, /ˈliːdʒ(ə)/

NounEdit

lege (plural leges or lege)

  1. (One of) one's subjects or vassals; (one of) those under one's control.
  2. A hireling or servant; one who is in another's service.
  3. (rare) One's feudal overlords or superiors.
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

AdjectiveEdit

lege

  1. Being able to command obedience from one's inferiors.
  2. Tied by pledge to obey one's superiors; being subjected by an authority to duty.
  3. (rare) Otherwise bound by feudal obligations.
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English læce and Old Norse læknari

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /leːɡʲə/

NounEdit

lege m (definite singular legen, indefinite plural leger, definite plural legene)

  1. a doctor

SynonymsEdit

VerbEdit

lege (imperative leg, present tense leger, passive leges, simple past lega or leget or legte, past participle lega or leget or legt, present participle legende)

  1. to heal, cure

Related termsEdit

lækje (Bokmål)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Danish læge

NounEdit

lege m (definite singular legen, indefinite plural legar, definite plural legane)

  1. doctor (physician)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse lega.

NounEdit

lege f (definite singular lega, indefinite plural leger, definite plural legene)

  1. the act of lying (resting in a horizontal position)
  2. a place where something lies, e.g. an animal

VerbEdit

lege

  1. neuter past participle of liggja, liggje, ligga and ligge

Further readingEdit


Pennsylvania GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare German legen, Dutch leggen, English lay.

VerbEdit

lege

  1. to lay
  2. to put, to place

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin lēgem, accusative of lēx, from Proto-Italic *lēg-, from Proto-Indo-European *leǵ-s, from *leǵ- (to gather).

NounEdit

lege f (plural legi)

  1. law
  2. (archaic) religion, belief (in God or a divinity), credence
DeclensionEdit
SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

lege

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of lega
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of lega