leisurely

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈlɛʒɜli/
  • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈliʒɚli/

Etymology 1Edit

From leisure +‎ -ly.

AdjectiveEdit

leisurely (comparative more leisurely, superlative most leisurely)

  1. Characterized by leisure; taking plenty of time; unhurried
    He goes about his business in a leisurely manner
    As we had a free morning, we went on a leisurely walk around the city.
    • 1900, Charles W. Chesnutt, “chapter I”, in The House Behind the Cedars:
      Warwick passed through one of the wide brick arches and traversed the building with a leisurely step.
    • 1960 February, Cecil J. Allen, “Locomotive Running Past and Present”, in Trains Illustrated, page 86:
      The minimum of 48 m.p.h. up the 1 in 200 to Ardley summit was on the leisurely side, [...].
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From leisurelily, by haplology.

AdverbEdit

leisurely (comparative more leisurely, superlative most leisurely)

  1. In a leisurely manner.
    • 1838, Catherine Grace Frances Gore, Mary Raymond, and Other Tales (volume 2, page 124)
      For some minutes he walked leisurely but uncollectedly, along the line of stalls; as if contemplating the rich display of summer fruits still remaining unsold.
    • 1943, Raymond Chandler, The High Window, Penguin 2005, p. 37:
      Sunset Crescent Drive curved leisurely north from Sunset Boulevard, well beyond the Bel-Air Country Club golf-course.
TranslationsEdit