See also: limé, līme, and łime

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lyme, lym, lime, from Old English līm, from Proto-Germanic *līmaz. Cognate with Saterland Frisian Liem (glue), Dutch lijm, German Leim (glue), Danish lim (from Old Norse lím), Latin limus (mud).

NounEdit

lime (countable and uncountable, plural limes)

  1. (chemistry) Any inorganic material containing calcium, usually calcium oxide (quicklime) or calcium hydroxide (slaked lime).
    • 1952, L.F. Salzman, Building in England, page 149.
      Lime, which is the product of the burning of chalk or limestone, might be bought ready burnt, or it could be burnt in kilns specially constructed in the neighbourhood of the building operations.
  2. (poetic) Any gluey or adhesive substance; something which traps or captures someone; sometimes a synonym for birdlime.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by William Shakespeare, act 4 scene 1
      Monster, come, put some lime upon your fingers, and away with the rest.
    • 1835, William Wordsworth, They called Thee Merry England, in old time [first line of unnamed poem]
      Like the lime which foolish birds are caught with.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

lime (third-person singular simple present limes, present participle liming, simple past and past participle limed)

  1. (transitive) To treat with calcium hydroxide or calcium oxide (lime).
  2. (transitive) To smear with birdlime.
    1. (rare) To ensnare, catch, entrap.
  3. (transitive) To apply limewash.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
Avenue of limes (Tilia) in Prague.

An alteration of line, a variant form of lind.

NounEdit

lime (countable and uncountable, plural limes)

  1. A deciduous tree of the genus Tilia, especially Tilia × europaea; the linden tree.
    • 1871, George Eliot [pseudonym; Mary Ann Evans], chapter III, in Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life, volume I, Edinburgh; London: William Blackwood and Sons, OCLC 948783829, book I (Miss Brooke), page 38:
      But there was nothing of an ascetic's expression in her bright full eyes, as she looked before her, not consciously seeing, but absorbing into the intensity of her mood, the solemn glory of the afternoon with its long swathes of light between the far-off rows of limes, whose shadows touched each other.
  2. The wood of this tree.
Usage notesEdit

Both this and the citrus are trees with fragrant flowers, but this is more temperate and the citrus is more tropical and subtropical. Outside of Europe and adjoining parts of Asia, the citrus sense is much more common

Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
Avocados and limes.

From French lime, from Spanish lima, from Arabic لِيمَة(līma), from Persian لیمو(līmū).

NounEdit

lime (plural limes)

  1. Any of several green citrus fruit, somewhat smaller and sharper-tasting than a lemon.
  2. Any of the trees that bear limes, especially Key lime, Citrus aurantiifolia.
  3. A brilliant, sometimes yellowish, green colour associated with the fruits of a lime tree.
    lime:  
    web lime:  
  4. (fandom slang) A fan fiction story which contains sexual references, but stops short of full, explicit descriptions of sexual activity (coined by analogy with lemon).
    • 1998 June 8, Gary Kleppe, “[Ranma][Fanfic] Tangled Web”, in rec.arts.anime.creative, Usenet[1]:
      WARNING: This is a lime. While it does not show explicit sex, as a lemon would, references to sexual situations abound.
    • 1998 December 29, jiml...@earthlink.net, “[EVA][FanFic][Lemon] Garden of EVA 0:6x - Wet Dreams Bite!”, in rec.arts.anime.creative, Usenet[2]:
      Even with all the sex in Garden of EVA, I still think the main stories are better for just being the lemon-scented limes that they are.
    • 2001 November 27, Schemer, “[Ranma/SF][FanFic] A Learning Experience - Chapter 01”, in rec.arts.anime.creative, Usenet[3]:
      I have no intention of writing any lemon scenes, limes are possibilities but unlikely and if they occur they will be few in number.
Usage notesEdit

Both this and the linden are trees with fragrant flowers, but the linden is more temperate and this is more tropical and subtropical. Outside of Europe and adjoining parts of Asia, this sense is much more common.

Derived termsEdit
terms derived from lime ("Citrus")
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See alsoEdit
Colors in English · colors, colours (layout · text)
     white      gray, grey      black
             red; crimson              orange; brown              yellow; cream
             lime              green              mint
             cyan; teal              azure, sky blue              blue
             violet; indigo              magenta; purple              pink

AdjectiveEdit

lime (not comparable)

  1. Containing lime or lime juice.
  2. Having the aroma or flavor of lime.
  3. Lime-green.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Back-formation from limer.

VerbEdit

lime (third-person singular simple present limes, present participle liming, simple past and past participle limed)

  1. (Caribbean, Trinidad & Tobago) To hang out/socialize in an informal, relaxed environment, especially with friends, for example at a party or on the beach.

Etymology 5Edit

NounEdit

lime (plural limes)

  1. Alternative form of lyam (a leash)
Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

NounEdit

lime c (singular definite limen, plural indefinite lime or limes)

  1. lime (fruit)

InflectionEdit

VerbEdit

lime (imperative lim, infinitive at lime, present tense limer, past tense limede, perfect tense har limet)

  1. to glue

FatalukuEdit

NumeralEdit

lime

  1. five

FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlime/, [ˈlime̞]
  • Rhymes: -ime
  • Syllabification: li‧me

NounEdit

lime

  1. lime (citrus tree and its fruit)

Usage notesEdit

This word is now more common than limetti but still regarded as less correct by, for example, the Kielitoimiston sanakirja. Some inflected forms are indeed quite awkward to use.

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of lime (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative lime limet
genitive limen limejen
partitive limeä limejä
illative limeen limeihin
singular plural
nominative lime limet
accusative nom. lime limet
gen. limen
genitive limen limejen
limeinrare
partitive limeä limejä
inessive limessä limeissä
elative limestä limeistä
illative limeen limeihin
adessive limellä limeillä
ablative limeltä limeiltä
allative limelle limeille
essive limenä limeinä
translative limeksi limeiksi
instructive limein
abessive limettä limeittä
comitative limeineen
Possessive forms of lime (type nalle)
possessor singular plural
1st person limeni limemme
2nd person limesi limenne
3rd person limensä

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lim/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -im

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin līma.

NounEdit

lime f (plural limes)

  1. file (tool)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Spanish lima, from Arabic لِيمَة(līma).

NounEdit

lime f (plural limes)

  1. lime (fruit, tree)
SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

lime

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of limar

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

lime f pl

  1. plural of lima

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English.

NounEdit

lime m (invariable)

  1. lime (citrus tree)

AnagramsEdit


Jamaican CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlaɪm/
  • Hyphenation: lime

NounEdit

lime (plural: lime dem, quantified: lime)

  1. lime (small green citrus fruit)
    It sour like lime.It's as sour as a lime.
    When the virus get drastic, mi a guh draw fi mi garlic and lime.
    When the virus gets worse, I'm going to start taking garlic and lime.
  2. hangout, get-together (social gathering)

VerbEdit

lime

  1. hang out
  2. dawdle, idle

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

līme

  1. vocative singular of līmus

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English lim.

NounEdit

lime

  1. Alternative form of lyme (limb)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English līm.

NounEdit

lime

  1. Alternative form of lyme (quicklime)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology 1Edit

From Persian لیمو(līmū), via Arabic لِيمَة(līma), Spanish lima, and English lime

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lime m (definite singular limen, indefinite plural limer, definite plural limene)

  1. a lime (citrus fruit)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse líma

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lime (imperative lim, present tense limer, passive limes, simple past lima or limet or limte, past participle lima or limet or limt, present participle limende)

  1. to glue or paste (something)
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse líma.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lime (present tense limer, past tense limde/limte, past participle limt, passive infinitive limast, present participle limande, imperative lim)

  1. (transitive) to glue
Alternative formsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn
 
ein oppskoren lime

Borrowed from English lime. From Persian لیمو(līmū), via Arabic لِيمَة(līma).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lime m (definite singular limen, indefinite plural limar, definite plural limane)

  1. (citrus fruit) a lime
  2. (usually uncountable) lime juice
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn
 
ein sopelime

From Old Norse lími.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lime m (definite singular limen, indefinite plural limar, definite plural limane)

  1. a besom, broom
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

lime

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of limar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of limar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of limar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of limar

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lime

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of limar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of limar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of limar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of limar.

YakanEdit

NumeralEdit

lime

  1. five