See also: limé, līme, and łime

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English lyme, lym, lime, from Old English līm, from Proto-West Germanic *līm, from Proto-Germanic *līmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂leyH- (to smear).

Cognate with Saterland Frisian Liem (glue), Dutch lijm, German Leim (glue), Danish lim (from Old Norse lím), Latin limus (mud).

Noun

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lime (countable and uncountable, plural limes)

  1. (chemistry) Any inorganic material containing calcium, usually calcium oxide (quicklime) or calcium hydroxide (slaked lime).
    • 1952, L.F. Salzman, Building in England, page 149:
      Lime, which is the product of the burning of chalk or limestone, might be bought ready burnt, or it could be burnt in kilns specially constructed in the neighbourhood of the building operations.
  2. (poetic) Any gluey or adhesive substance; something which traps or captures someone; sometimes a synonym for birdlime.
  3. (theater) A spotlight.
    • 1980, Peter Evans, Peter Sellers: The Mask Behind the Mask, page 30:
      Sellers moved on until he was actually trusted to operate the limes, the spotlights that can make or destroy an artist's act.
    • 2018, Robert Charles Hines, Twists and Turns: 13 Tales of the Uneasy, page 121:
      Then out of the blue, a spotlight much like the “limes” in a theatre, lit up what seemed like a Punch and Judy tent [] He struggled even more, when from out of the shadows and into the bright light of the limes, stepped Uncle Jolly.
Derived terms
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terms derived from lime (alkali substance)
Translations
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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See also
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Verb

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lime (third-person singular simple present limes, present participle liming, simple past and past participle limed)

  1. (transitive) To treat with calcium hydroxide or calcium oxide (lime).
  2. (transitive) To smear with birdlime.
    1. (rare) To ensnare, catch, entrap.
      • 1598–1599 (first performance), William Shakespeare, “Much Adoe about Nothing”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act III, scene i]:
        URSULA. She's lim'd, I warrant you: we have caught her, madam.
        HERO. If it prove so, then loving goes by haps:<brSome Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps.
      • 1891, Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urbervilles, volume 1, London: James R. Osgood, McIlvaine and Co., page 39:
        Abraham, like his parents, seemed to have been limed and caught by the ensnaring inn.
  3. (transitive) To apply limewash.
Translations
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Etymology 2

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Avenue of limes (Tilia) in Prague.

Lime (17th c.) and line (16th c.) are alterations of obsolete lind, from Middle English lynde, from Old English lind, from Proto-Germanic *lindijō. The phonetic development is unusual, but it has been suggested that it began in compounds (loss of -d- perhaps before tree, the change to -m- before labials as in bark or wood). Doublet of linden, which see.

Noun

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lime (countable and uncountable, plural limes)

  1. A deciduous tree of the genus Tilia, especially Tilia × europaea; the linden tree.
    • 1871, George Eliot [pseudonym; Mary Ann Evans], chapter III, in Middlemarch [], volume I, Edinburgh, London: William Blackwood and Sons, →OCLC, book I, page 38:
      But there was nothing of an ascetic's expression in her bright full eyes, as she looked before her, not consciously seeing, but absorbing into the intensity of her mood, the solemn glory of the afternoon with its long swathes of light between the far-off rows of limes, whose shadows touched each other.
  2. The wood of this tree.
Usage notes
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Both this and the citrus are trees with fragrant flowers, but this is more temperate and the citrus is more tropical and subtropical. Outside of Europe and adjoining parts of Asia, the citrus sense is much more common

Derived terms
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terms derived from noun lime (tree)
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Translations
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Etymology 3

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
A lime.

From French lime, from Spanish lima, from Arabic لِيمَة (līma), from Persian لیمو (limu). Doublet of lemon.

Noun

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lime (countable and uncountable, plural limes)

  1. Any of several green citrus fruit, somewhat smaller and sharper-tasting than a lemon.
  2. Any of the trees that bear limes, especially Key lime, Citrus aurantiifolia.
  3. (uncountable) A brilliant, sometimes yellowish, green colour associated with the fruits of a lime tree.
    lime:  
    web lime:  
  4. (fandom slang) A fan fiction story which contains sexual references, but stops short of full, explicit descriptions of sexual activity (coined by analogy with lemon).
    • 1998 June 8, Gary Kleppe, “[Ranma][Fanfic] Tangled Web”, in rec.arts.anime.creative[1] (Usenet):
      WARNING: This is a lime. While it does not show explicit sex, as a lemon would, references to sexual situations abound.
    • 1998 December 29, jiml...@earthlink.net, “[EVA][FanFic][Lemon] Garden of EVA 0:6x - Wet Dreams Bite!”, in rec.arts.anime.creative[2] (Usenet):
      Even with all the sex in Garden of EVA, I still think the main stories are better for just being the lemon-scented limes that they are.
    • 2001 November 27, Schemer, “[Ranma/SF][FanFic] A Learning Experience - Chapter 01”, in rec.arts.anime.creative[3] (Usenet):
      I have no intention of writing any lemon scenes, limes are possibilities but unlikely and if they occur they will be few in number.
Usage notes
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Both this and the linden are trees with fragrant flowers, but the linden is more temperate and this is more tropical and subtropical. Outside of Europe and adjoining parts of Asia, this sense is much more common.

Hypernyms
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Derived terms
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terms derived from lime ("Citrus")
Translations
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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See also
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Colors/Colours in English (layout · text)
             red          orange              yellow              green              blue (incl.      indigo;
             cyan, teal, turquoise)
             purple / violet
         pink (including
         magenta)
         brown      white              grey/gray      black

Adjective

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lime (not comparable)

  1. Containing lime or lime juice.
  2. Having the aroma or flavor of lime.
  3. Lime-green.
Translations
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Etymology 4

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Back-formation from limer.

Verb

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lime (third-person singular simple present limes, present participle liming, simple past and past participle limed)

  1. (Caribbean, Trinidad & Tobago) To hang out/socialize in an informal, relaxed environment, especially with friends, for example at a party or on the beach.

Noun

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lime (plural limes)

  1. (Caribbean, Trinidad & Tobago) A casual gathering to socialize.

Etymology 5

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Noun

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lime (plural limes)

  1. Alternative form of lyam (a leash)
Derived terms
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Anagrams

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Bakumpai

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Etymology

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Inherited from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *lima.

Numeral

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lime

  1. five

Danish

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Etymology 1

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From English lime.

Noun

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lime c (singular definite limen, plural indefinite lime or limes)

  1. lime (fruit)
Inflection
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Etymology 2

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From the noun lim (glue).

Verb

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lime (imperative lim, infinitive at lime, present tense limer, past tense limede, perfect tense har limet)

  1. to glue

Fataluku

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Numeral

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lime

  1. five

Finnish

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Etymology

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From English lime.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈlime/, [ˈlime̞]
  • IPA(key): /ˈlɑi̯m/, [ˈlɑ̝i̯m]
  • Rhymes: -ime
  • Syllabification(key): li‧me

Noun

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lime

  1. (proscribed) lime (citrus tree and its fruit)
    Synonym: limetti
  2. lime or lemon juice as part of a cocktail

Declension

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Inflection of lime (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative lime limet
genitive limen limejen
partitive limeä limejä
illative limeen limeihin
singular plural
nominative lime limet
accusative nom. lime limet
gen. limen
genitive limen limejen
limein rare
partitive limeä limejä
inessive limessä limeissä
elative limestä limeistä
illative limeen limeihin
adessive limellä limeillä
ablative limeltä limeiltä
allative limelle limeille
essive limenä limeinä
translative limeksi limeiksi
abessive limettä limeittä
instructive limein
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of lime (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative limeni limeni
accusative nom. limeni limeni
gen. limeni
genitive limeni limejeni
limeini rare
partitive limeäni limejäni
inessive limessäni limeissäni
elative limestäni limeistäni
illative limeeni limeihini
adessive limelläni limeilläni
ablative limeltäni limeiltäni
allative limelleni limeilleni
essive limenäni limeinäni
translative limekseni limeikseni
abessive limettäni limeittäni
instructive
comitative limeineni
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative limesi limesi
accusative nom. limesi limesi
gen. limesi
genitive limesi limejesi
limeisi rare
partitive limeäsi limejäsi
inessive limessäsi limeissäsi
elative limestäsi limeistäsi
illative limeesi limeihisi
adessive limelläsi limeilläsi
ablative limeltäsi limeiltäsi
allative limellesi limeillesi
essive limenäsi limeinäsi
translative limeksesi limeiksesi
abessive limettäsi limeittäsi
instructive
comitative limeinesi
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative limemme limemme
accusative nom. limemme limemme
gen. limemme
genitive limemme limejemme
limeimme rare
partitive limeämme limejämme
inessive limessämme limeissämme
elative limestämme limeistämme
illative limeemme limeihimme
adessive limellämme limeillämme
ablative limeltämme limeiltämme
allative limellemme limeillemme
essive limenämme limeinämme
translative limeksemme limeiksemme
abessive limettämme limeittämme
instructive
comitative limeinemme
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative limenne limenne
accusative nom. limenne limenne
gen. limenne
genitive limenne limejenne
limeinne rare
partitive limeänne limejänne
inessive limessänne limeissänne
elative limestänne limeistänne
illative limeenne limeihinne
adessive limellänne limeillänne
ablative limeltänne limeiltänne
allative limellenne limeillenne
essive limenänne limeinänne
translative limeksenne limeiksenne
abessive limettänne limeittänne
instructive
comitative limeinenne
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative limensä limensä
accusative nom. limensä limensä
gen. limensä
genitive limensä limejensä
limeinsä rare
partitive limeään
limeänsä
limejään
limejänsä
inessive limessään
limessänsä
limeissään
limeissänsä
elative limestään
limestänsä
limeistään
limeistänsä
illative limeensä limeihinsä
adessive limellään
limellänsä
limeillään
limeillänsä
ablative limeltään
limeltänsä
limeiltään
limeiltänsä
allative limelleen
limellensä
limeilleen
limeillensä
essive limenään
limenänsä
limeinään
limeinänsä
translative limekseen
limeksensä
limeikseen
limeiksensä
abessive limettään
limettänsä
limeittään
limeittänsä
instructive
comitative limeineen
limeinensä

Derived terms

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compounds

Further reading

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Anagrams

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French

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Latin līma.

Noun

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lime f (plural limes)

  1. file (tool)
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Spanish lima, from Arabic لِيمَة (līma).

Noun

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lime f (plural limes)

  1. lime (fruit, tree)
    Synonym: limette

Further reading

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Anagrams

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Galician

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Verb

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lime

  1. inflection of limar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Italian

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈli.me/
  • Rhymes: -ime
  • Hyphenation: lì‧me

Etymology 1

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Noun

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lime f pl

  1. plural of lima

Etymology 2

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Borrowed from English lime.

Noun

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lime m (invariable)

  1. lime (citrus tree)

Anagrams

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Jamaican Creole

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Etymology

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(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈlaɪm/
  • Hyphenation: lime

Noun

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lime (plural lime dem, quantified lime)

  1. lime (small green citrus fruit)
    It sour like lime.It's as sour as a lime.
    When the virus get drastic, mi a guh draw fi mi garlic and lime.
    When the virus gets worse, I'm going to start taking garlic and lime.
  2. hangout, get-together (social gathering)

Verb

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lime

  1. hang out
  2. dawdle, idle

Further reading

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Latin

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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līme

  1. vocative singular of līmus

Middle English

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Etymology 1

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Noun

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lime

  1. Alternative form of lym (quicklime)

Etymology 2

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Noun

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lime

  1. Alternative form of lyme (limb)

Norwegian Bokmål

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Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology 1

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From Persian لیمو (limu), via Arabic لِيمَة (līma), Spanish lima, and English lime.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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lime m (definite singular limen, indefinite plural limer, definite plural limene)

  1. a lime (citrus fruit)

Etymology 2

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From Old Norse líma.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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lime (imperative lim, present tense limer, passive limes, simple past lima or limet or limte, past participle lima or limet or limt, present participle limende)

  1. to glue or paste (something)
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References

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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Etymology 1

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From Old Norse líma.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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lime (present tense limer, past tense limde/limte, past participle limt, passive infinitive limast, present participle limande, imperative lim)

  1. (transitive) to glue
Alternative forms
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Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn
 
ein oppskoren lime

Borrowed from English lime. From Persian لیمو (limu), via Arabic لِيمَة (līma).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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lime m (definite singular limen, indefinite plural limar, definite plural limane)

  1. (citrus fruit) a lime
  2. (usually uncountable) lime juice
Synonyms
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Derived terms
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Etymology 3

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Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn
 
ein sopelime

From Old Norse lími.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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lime m (definite singular limen, indefinite plural limar, definite plural limane)

  1. a besom, broom
Derived terms
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References

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Anagrams

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Portuguese

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Verb

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lime

  1. inflection of limar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Spanish

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈlime/ [ˈli.me]
  • Rhymes: -ime
  • Syllabification: li‧me

Verb

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lime

  1. inflection of limar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Anagrams

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Swedish

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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lime c

  1. a lime (fruit)
    Synonym: limefrukt
  2. lime juice
    Synonym: limejuice

Declension

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Declension of lime 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lime limen limer limerna
Genitive limes limens limers limernas

See also

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References

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Yakan

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Numeral

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lime

  1. five