See also: língua

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from Latin lingua (the tongue). Doublet of langue.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lingua (plural linguae or linguas)

  1. (anatomy) Synonym of tongue.
  2. (entomology) A median process of the labium, at the underside of the mouth in insects, and serving as a tongue.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • lingua”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lingua.

NounEdit

lingua f (plural linguas)

  1. tongue
    botar a lingua a pacer (idiom)
    to ramble; to be indiscreet
    (literally, “to put the tongue to graze”)
  2. language

Guinea-Bissau CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese língua. Cognate with Kabuverdianu lingua.

NounEdit

lingua

  1. tongue
  2. language

InterlinguaEdit

 
Interlingua Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ia

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lingua (plural linguas)

  1. tongue
  2. language

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lingua.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlin.ɡwa/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -inɡwa
  • Hyphenation: lìn‧gua

NounEdit

lingua f (plural lingue)

  1. tongue
  2. language, tongue
  3. strip, tongue (of land)
  4. (in the plural) foreign languages
  5. the square horn of an anvil
  6. (especially in plural) a type of Italian flatbread

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Greek: λίγκα (lígka)
  • Maltese: lingwa

AnagramsEdit


KabuverdianuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese língua.

NounEdit

lingua

  1. tongue
  2. language

LadinoEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lingua.

NounEdit

lingua f (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling לינגוה‎, plural linguas)

  1. tongue
  2. (linguistics) language

SynonymsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From older dingua (attested as a rare word in Gaius Marius Victorinus), from Proto-Italic *denɣwā, from Proto-Indo-European *dn̥ǵʰwéh₂s. The change of d- to l- is variously explained by a borrowing from another Italic language with such a shift and/or by a folk-etymological association with the verb lingō (to lick). Cognates include German Zunge and English tongue.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lingua f (genitive linguae); first declension

  1. (literally) the tongue
  2. (transferred sense)
    1. a tongue, utterance, language, speech
      • 29 BCE – 19 BCE, Virgil, Aeneid 11.338:
         [], largus opum et lingua melior, sed frigida bello dextera, []
         []: lavish of his wealth, and a better speaker, but with a hand frozen in battle: []
      1. the tongue or language of a people
        • 45 BCE, Cicero, De finibus bonorum et malorum 1.10:
           [], Latinam linguam non modo non inopem, ut vulgo putarent, sed locupletiorem etiam esse quam Graecam.
           [], the Latin language, so far from having a poor vocabulary, as is commonly supposed, is actually richer than the Greek.
        1. (post-Classical) a dialect, idiom or mode of speech
          • c. 95 CE, Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria 12.10.34:
            [] illis non verborum modo, sed linguarum etiam inter se differentium copia est.
            they [the Greeks] have not merely abundance of words, but they have also a number of different dialects.
      2. (poetic, of animals) a voice, note, song, bark, etc.
        • 29 BCE – 19 BCE, Virgil, Aeneid 3.361:
          volucrum linguas et praepetis omina pennae
          the language of birds and the omens of their wings in flight
      3. an utterance, expression
        • c. 95 CE, Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria 1.1.35:
          protinus enim potest interpretationem linguae secretioris, quas Graeci γλώσσας vocant
          He can readily learn the explanations or glosses, as the Greeks call them, of the more obscure words by the way
    2. tongue-shaped things:
      1. Ranunculus lingua (a flowering plant)
        Synonym: lingulāca
      2. the oxtongue, bugloss
        • c. 77 CE – 79 CE, Pliny the Elder, Naturalis Historia 17.112:
           [], lingua bubula—herbae id genus est—insuper optegi iubet eamque inligari opertam stramentis: []
           [], but he says it must be covered with a layer of bugloss—a species of plant—as well, and that this should be tied on with a layer of straw; []
      3. the houndstongue
        Synonym: cynoglōssos
      4. a tongue of land
      5. a spoonful
        Synonym: lingula
      6. (music) the tongue or reed of a Roman tibiae
        • c. 77 CE – 79 CE, Pliny the Elder, Naturalis Historia 10.84:
          [] homines repertos qui sonum earum addita in transversas harundines aqua foramen inspirantes linguave parva aliqua opposita mora indiscreta redderent similitudine.
          [] there have been found persons who could reproduce the birds' song with an indistinguishable resemblence by putting water into slanted reeds and breathing into the holes or by applying some slight check with the tongue.
      7. (classical mechanics) the short arm of a lever
        • c. 15 BCE, Vitruvius, De architectura 10.8:
          [] lingua sub onus subdita, caput eius unius hominis viribus pressum id onus extollit.
          with the tongue of the lever placed under the weight, one man's strength, bearing down upon the head of it, heaves up the weight.

InflectionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative lingua linguae
Genitive linguae linguārum
Dative linguae linguīs
Accusative linguam linguās
Ablative linguā linguīs
Vocative lingua linguae

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • lingua in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • lingua in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • lingua in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • lingua in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to have a ready tongue: lingua promptum esse
    • volubility: linguae solutio
    • the Greek language is a richer one than the Latin: lingua graeca latinā locupletior (copiosior, uberior) est
    • intercourse of speech: commercium linguae
    • volubility: volubilitas, solutio linguae
    • to be united by having a common language: eiusdem linguae societate coniunctum esse cum aliquo (De Or. 3. 59. 223)
    • to speak the Greek language: graece or graeca lingua loqui
    • to know Latin: latinam linguam scire or didicisse
    • to introduce a new word into the Latin language: inducere novum verbum in latinam linguam
    • maintain a devout silence (properly, utter no ill-omened word): favete ore, linguis = εὐφημειτε

RomanschEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lingua (tongue, speech, language).

NounEdit

lingua f (plural linguas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) language

SynonymsEdit


SicilianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lingua (tongue, language).

NounEdit

lingua f (plural lingui)

  1. tongue
  2. language