See also: língua

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin lingua (the tongue). Doublet of langue and tongue.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lingua (plural linguae or linguas)

  1. (anatomy) Synonym of tongue.
  2. (entomology) A median process of the labium, at the underside of the mouth in insects, and serving as a tongue.

ReferencesEdit

  • lingua”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary, (Please provide a date or year).

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lingua.

NounEdit

lingua f (plural linguas)

  1. tongue
    botar a lingua a pacer (idiom)
    to ramble; to be indiscreet
    (literally, “to put the tongue to graze”)
  2. language

Guinea-Bissau CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese língua. Cognate with Kabuverdianu lingua.

NounEdit

lingua

  1. tongue
  2. language

InterlinguaEdit

 
Interlingua Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ia

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lingua (plural linguas)

  1. tongue
  2. language

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lingua.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlin.ɡwa/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: lìn‧gua

NounEdit

lingua f (plural lingue)

  1. tongue
  2. language, tongue
  3. strip, tongue (of land)
  4. (in the plural) foreign languages
  5. the square horn of an anvil
  6. (especially in plural) A type of Italian flatbread

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Greek: λίγκα (lígka)

AnagramsEdit


KabuverdianuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese língua.

NounEdit

lingua

  1. tongue
  2. language

LadinoEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lingua.

NounEdit

lingua f (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling לינגוה‎, plural linguas)

  1. tongue
  2. (linguistics) language

SynonymsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From older dingua (attested as a rare word in Gaius Marius Victorinus), from Proto-Italic *denɣwā, from Proto-Indo-European *dn̥ǵʰwéh₂s. The change of d- to l- is variously explained by a borrowing from another Italic language with such a shift and/or by a folk-etymological association with the verb lingō (lick).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lingua f (genitive linguae); first declension

  1. (literally, anatomy) tongue
  2. (transferred sense)
    1. tongue, utterance, language, speech
      1. tongue or language of a people
        1. dialect, idiom or mode of speech
      2. (poetic) (of animals) voice, note, song, bark, etc.
      3. utterance, expression
    2. tongue-shaped things:
      1. Ranunculus lingua (a flowering plant)
        Synonym: lingulāca
      2. oxtongue, bugloss
      3. houndstongue
        Synonym: cynoglōssos
      4. tongue of land
      5. spoonful
      6. (music) tongue or reed of the Roman tibiae
      7. (classical mechanics) short arm of a lever
  This entry needs quotations to illustrate usage. If you come across any interesting, durably archived quotes then please add them!

InflectionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative lingua linguae
Genitive linguae linguārum
Dative linguae linguīs
Accusative linguam linguās
Ablative linguā linguīs
Vocative lingua linguae

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • lingua in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • lingua in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • lingua in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • lingua in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to have a ready tongue: lingua promptum esse
    • volubility: linguae solutio
    • the Greek language is a richer one than the Latin: lingua graeca latinā locupletior (copiosior, uberior) est
    • intercourse of speech: commercium linguae
    • volubility: volubilitas, solutio linguae
    • to be united by having a common language: eiusdem linguae societate coniunctum esse cum aliquo (De Or. 3. 59. 223)
    • to speak the Greek language: graece or graeca lingua loqui
    • to know Latin: latinam linguam scire or didicisse
    • to introduce a new word into the Latin language: inducere novum verbum in latinam linguam
    • maintain a devout silence (properly, utter no ill-omened word): favete ore, linguis = εὐφημειτε

RomanschEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lingua (tongue, speech, language).

NounEdit

lingua f (plural linguas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) language

SynonymsEdit


SicilianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin lingua (tongue, language).

NounEdit

lingua f (plural lingui)

  1. tongue
  2. language