See also: Linum

Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *līno-. Cognate with Lithuanian linas, Greek λίνον ‎(línon), Russian лён ‎(ljon), Serbo-Croatian lan, Albanian li, Old English līne ‎(line, rope, cord). More at line.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

līnum n ‎(genitive līnī); second declension

  1. flax
  2. linen cloth; garment made of linen
  3. rope, line, string, thread, cord, cable
  4. net for hunting or fishing
  5. wick of a lamp
  6. sail

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative līnum līna
genitive līnī līnōrum
dative līnō līnīs
accusative līnum līna
ablative līnō līnīs
vocative līnum līna

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • linum in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • linum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • LINUM” in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • linum” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to open a letter: epistulam solvere, aperire, resignare (of Romans also linum incīdere)
  • linum in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

VolapükEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

linum ‎(plural linums)

  1. flax

DeclensionEdit

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