See also: Loke

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English *loke, from Old English loca (a bar, bolt; enclosure, stronghold), from Proto-Germanic *lukô, *lukōn (lock, opening), from Proto-Indo-European *lewg- (to bend, turn). More at lock.

NounEdit

loke (plural lokes)

  1. (UK dialectal) The wicket or hatch of a door.
  2. (UK dialectal) A close narrow lane; a cul-de-sac.
  3. (UK dialectal) A private path or road.
  4. (UK dialectal) A small field or meadow.

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

A derivative of loc[1].

NounEdit

loke f (indefinite plural loke, definite singular lokja, definite plural loket)

  1. dear, darling
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “loke” in Vladimir Orel (1998), Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Ledien, Boston, Köln: Brill Academic Publishers, page 230

DutchEdit

VerbEdit

loke

  1. singular past subjunctive of luiken

AnagramsEdit


HawaiianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from English rose.

NounEdit

loke

  1. (botany) rose

ReferencesEdit

  • Mary Kawena Pukui - Samuel H. Elbert, Hawaiian Dictionary, University of Hawaii Press 1986
Last modified on 18 December 2013, at 13:46