See also: Lop, løp, löp, lốp, and lớp

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lɒp/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒp
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English loppe (bough); the verb is a back-formation from the adjective.

VerbEdit

lop (third-person singular simple present lops, present participle lopping, simple past and past participle lopped or lopt)

  1. (transitive, usually with off) To cut off as the top or extreme part of anything, especially to prune a small limb off a shrub or tree, or sometimes to behead someone.
  2. To hang downward; to be pendent; to lean to one side.
  3. To allow to hang down.
    to lop the head
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

lop (plural lops)

  1. That which is lopped from anything, such as branches from a tree.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Mortimer to this entry?)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • lop” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English loppe (flea, spider), from Old English loppe (spider, silk-worm, flea), from Proto-Germanic *luppǭ (flea, sandflea", originally, "jumper), from Proto-Germanic *luppijaną (to jump, dart). Cognate with Danish loppe (flea), Swedish loppa (flea). Compare also Middle High German lüpfen, lupfen (“to raise”, obsolete also “to rise”).

NounEdit

lop (plural lops)

  1. (Geordie) A flea.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cleveland to this entry?)
    Hadway wi ye man, ye liftin wi lops.

ReferencesEdit

  • The New Geordie Dictionary, Frank Graham, 1987, →ISBN
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, →ISBN
  • lop in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • lop” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2020.
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [1]
  • Northumberland Words, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4
  • A List of words and phrases in everyday use by the natives of Hetton-le-Hole in the County of Durham, F.M.T.Palgrave, English Dialect Society vol.74, 1896, [2]
  • Todd's Geordie Words and Phrases, George Todd, Newcastle, 1977[3]

Etymology 3Edit

Back-formation from lopsided.

 
An English Lop rabbit

NounEdit

lop (plural lops)

  1. (US, dated, slang) (usually offensive) A disabled person, a cripple.
    • 1935: Rex Stout, The League of Frightened Men, p5
      "He's a lop; it mentions here about his getting up to the stand with his crippled leg but it doesn't say which one."
  2. Any of several breeds of rabbits whose ears lie flat.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


A-PucikwarEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Great Andamanese *lap

VerbEdit

lop

  1. to count

ReferencesEdit


Franco-ProvençalEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably influenced by French loup, from Latin lupus. Doublet of naturally inherited luef.

NounEdit

lop m (plural lops)

  1. wolf

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of unknown origin.[1]

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lop

  1. (transitive) to steal, to shoplift (from someone -tól/-től)
    Másoktól lop ötleteket.He/she steals ideas from others.

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

(With verbal prefixes):

DescendantsEdit

  • Serbo-Croatian: lopov

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Zaicz, Gábor. Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

lop

  1. Alternative form of loppe (spider)

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan lop, from Latin lupus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lop m (plural lops, feminine loba, feminine plural lobas)

  1. wolf

Derived termsEdit


VepsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *loppu.

NounEdit

lop

  1. end

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

lop (nominative plural lops)

  1. opera

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit