Open main menu
See also: Lunge and lungë

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

 
A tennis player lunging for the ball.

EtymologyEdit

From French allonge, from Old French alonge, from alongier, from Vulgar Latin *allongare, from ad + Late Latin longare, from Latin longus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /lʌndʒ/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌndʒ

NounEdit

lunge (plural lunges)

  1. A sudden forward movement, especially with a sword.
    • 2010 December 28, Kevin Darlin, “West Brom 1 - 3 Blackburn”, in BBC[1]:
      A moment of madness from double goalscorer Kalinic put Rovers' fate back in the balance when the Croat caught Scharner with a late, dangerous lunge and was shown a straight red card by referee Phil Dowd.
  2. A long rope or flat web line, more commonly referred to as a lunge line, approximately 20–30 feet long, attached to the bridle, lungeing cavesson, or halter of a horse and used to control the animal while lungeing.
  3. An exercise performed by stepping forward one leg while kneeling with the other leg, then returning to a standing position.
  4. A fish, the namaycush.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

lunge (third-person singular simple present lunges, present participle lunging or lungeing, simple past and past participle lunged)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To (cause to make) a sudden forward movement (present participle: lunging).
    I lunged at the police officer and made a grab for her gun.
    • 2004, Louis L'Amour, Rustlers of West Fork
      With savage desperation the Indian lunged his horse straight at Hopalong and, knife in hand, leaped for him!
  2. (transitive) To longe or work a horse in a circle around a handler (present participle: lunging or lungeing).

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈlun.d͡ʒe/, [ˈl̺un̺ʲd͡ʒe]
  • Hyphenation: lùn‧ge

AdverbEdit

lunge

  1. Archaic form of lungi.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *lungô (the light organ), from Proto-Indo-European *lengʷʰ- (light, agile, nimble). Compare Dutch long, English lung, Danish lunge, German Lunge, Swedish lunga, Icelandic lunga.

NounEdit

lunge m, f (definite singular lunga or lungen, indefinite plural lunger, definite plural lungene)

  1. (anatomy) a lung

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *lungô (the light organ), from Proto-Indo-European *lengʷʰ- (light, agile, nimble).

NounEdit

lunge f (definite singular lunga, indefinite plural lunger, definite plural lungene)

  1. (anatomy) a lung

Derived termsEdit