Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

made for each other

  1. (idiomatic, of two persons) Well suited to be in a relationship with one another, especially as romantic or marital partners.
    • 1856, T. S. Arthur, The Wedding Guest, "Elma's Mission":
      "I half-believe matches are made in Heaven—ours will be Heaven-made, if any are. You think human beings are made for each other, as the saying is, do you not?"
    • 1886, Georg Ebers, The Bride of the Nile, ch. 7:
      They were a pair that seemed made for each other, and Martina delighted in match-making.
    • 1905, Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth, ch. 4:
      But the deeper affinity was unmistakable: the two had the same prejudices and ideals. . . . [T]hey had a force of negation which eliminated everything beyond their own range of perception. Gryce and Miss Van Osburgh were, in short, made for each other by every law of moral and physical correspondence.
    • 2004 March 21, Steve Bloomfield, "Gay weddings on increase as 1,000 couples 'tie the knot'," Independent (UK) (retrieved 17 Sep 2015):
      "We're made for each other and we love each other and we don't care who knows it."
  2. (idiomatic) Compatible; interacting effectively; in a complementary relationship.
    • 1975 Dec. 29, "Music: The Year's Best IPs," Time (retrieved 17 Sep 2015):
      Sir Georg Solti and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra may have been made for each other, but they were also made to play Beethoven.
    • 2002 May 23, Pamela LiCalzi O'Connell, "Photographic Homes and Joke Captions," New York Times (retrieved 17 Sep 2015):
      "Photography and the Web were made for each other," said Mr. Mattison.
    • 2014 Nov. 19, Laura Nichols, "Thanksgiving sides make meal unique," Rochester Democrat and Chronicle (retrieved 17 Sep 2015):
      Turkey and cranberries were made for each other.

See alsoEdit