See also: Magis.

Contents

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Comparative of magnoperē (much, greatly), adverbial form of magnus (big, great), built from its root + Proto-Indo-European *-is, zero-grade of *-yōs. Full grade in māior/māius.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

magis (not comparable)

  1. more
  2. more greatly
  3. better
  4. rather

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • magis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • magis in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • MAGIS in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • magis” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • immorality is daily gaining ground: mores in dies magis labuntur (also with ad, e.g. ad mollitiem)
  • magis in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016