IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish maith (compare Scottish Gaelic math and Manx mie), from Proto-Celtic *matis (compare Welsh and Breton mad, Cornish mas).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

maith (genitive singular masculine maith, genitive singular feminine maithe, plural maithe, comparative fearr)

  1. good

Usage notesEdit

  • Takes the adverbial construction go maith when used predicatively after a form of :
  • Tá an anraith seo go maith.This soup is good.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

maith f (genitive singular maithe, nominative plural maithe)

  1. good, goodness

DeclensionEdit

VerbEdit

maith (present analytic maitheann, future analytic maithfidh, verbal noun maitheamh, past participle maite)

  1. forgive, pardon

InflectionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
maith mhaith not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Celtic *matis, from Proto-Indo-European *meh₂tis (ripe, good), from *meh₂- (to ripen, to mature). Cognate with Welsh mad and Gaulish mat.

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

maith (comparative ferr, superlative dech)

  1. good
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 15c23
      Hóre is cuci rigmi, is ferr dún placere illi.
      Since it is to him we will go, it is better for us to please him.
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 16b9
      Ní indráigne dúib cinin·fil lib, ar idib maithi cene.
      It is no detriment to you pl, though we are not with you, for you are good already.
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 51b10
      In tan as·mber Dauid “intellectum tibi dabo”, sech is arde són do·mbéra Día do neuch nod·n-eirbea ind ⁊ génas triit con·festar cid as imgabthi do dénum di ulc ⁊ cid as déinti dó di maith. Aithesc trá lesom insin a persin Dǽ.
      When David says, “I will give thee understanding”, that is a sign that God will give to everyone that will trust in him, and work through him, that he may know what evil he must avoid doing, and what good he must do. He has then here a reply in the person of God.
DeclensionEdit
i-stem
Singular Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative maith maith maith
Vocative maith
Accusative maith maith
Genitive maith maithe maith
Dative maith maith maith
Plural Masculine Feminine/neuter
Nominative maithi maithi
Vocative maithi
Accusative maithi
Genitive maith*
maithe
Dative maithib
Notes *not when substantivized
DescendantsEdit
  • Irish: maith
  • Manx: mie
  • Scottish Gaelic: math

Further readingEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

·maith

  1. third-person singular present indicative conjunct of maidid

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
maith
also mmaith after a proclitic
maith
pronounced with /ṽ(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Scottish GaelicEdit

VerbEdit

maith (past mhaith, future maithidh, verbal noun mathadh, past participle maithte)

  1. Alternative form of math

NounEdit

maith m

  1. genitive singular of math

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

maith (feminine singular maith, plural meithion, equative maithed, comparative maithach, superlative maithaf)

  1. long, far, large, extensive, numerous
  2. long-lasting, tedious, tiresome
  3. great (of quality)
  4. sad, bitter
  5. wise, clever, cunning, sly

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
maith faith unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.