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CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Catalan mant. Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *managiþō, cognate with Old French maint, or possibly from a conflation of tantus (many) + magnum (large).

AdjectiveEdit

mant (feminine manta, masculine plural mants, feminine plural mantes)

  1. much; a lot (of)
    • 1283, Ramón Lull, Blanquerna, page 76:
      Mant hom se vana que murria pel vostre Fill, si lloch venia; mas paucs son cells qui·l vagen preycar als infeels, car mort los fay duptar.
      Many men boast that they would die for your Son, if it came to that; however few are they who preach to the infidels, as death makes them doubt.
    • 1983, Isabel Clara Simó, Júlia, page 108:
      Trucà manta vegades. A la fi l’obriren, una minyona de cabells vermells que no hi era el dia que hi feren la visita en què es prometeren.
      He rang many times. Finally someone opened the door, a maid with red hair who wasn't there on the day he made the visit to promise themselves in marriage.

AdverbEdit

mant

  1. in abundance, galore

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Proto-Germanic *managiþō. Gallo-Romance cognate with Old French maint.

AdjectiveEdit

mant

  1. much; a lot (of)

ReferencesEdit