See also: menacé

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɛnɪs/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnɪs
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

First attested ante 1300: from Middle English manace, from the Old French manace, menace, from the Vulgar Latin *minācia, from mināx, mināciae (threatening; threats), from minor (I threaten).

NounEdit

menace (plural menaces)

  1. A perceived threat or danger.
  2. The act of threatening.
  3. (informal) An annoying and bothersome person or thing.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

First attested in 1303: from Middle English manacen, from Old French menacer, manecier, manechier and Anglo-Norman manasser, from the assumed Vulgar Latin *mināciāre, from Latin minācia, whence the noun.

VerbEdit

menace (third-person singular simple present menaces, present participle menacing, simple past and past participle menaced) (transitive, intransitive)

  1. (transitive) To make threats against (someone); to intimidate.
    to menace a country with war
    • c. 1591–1595, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Romeo and Ivliet”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene iii]:
      My master [] did menace me with death.
    • 1788 June, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, “Mr. Sheridan’s Speech, on Summing Up the Evidence on the Second, or Begum Charge against Warren Hastings, Esq., Delivered before the High Court of Parliament, June 1788”, in Select Speeches, Forensick and Parliamentary, with Prefatory Remarks by N[athaniel] Chapman, M.D., volume I, [Philadelphia, Pa.]: Published by Hopkins and Earle, no. 170, Market Street, published 1808, OCLC 230944105, page 474:
      The Begums' ministers, on the contrary, to extort from them the disclosure of the place which concealed the treasures, were, [] after being fettered and imprisoned, led out on to a scaffold, and this array of terrours proving unavailing, the meek tempered Middleton, as a dernier resort, menaced them with a confinement in the fortress of Chunargar. Thus, my lords, was a British garrison made the climax of cruelties!
  2. To threaten (an evil to be inflicted).
  3. To endanger (someone or something); to imperil or jeopardize.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • menace, v.” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd Ed.; 1989]

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French manace, from Vulgar Latin *minācia (threat), from Latin mināx (threatening), mināciae (threats).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

menace f (plural menaces)

  1. threat

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

menace

  1. inflection of menacer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further readingEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *minācia, from the plural of Latin mināx (threatening); cf. mināciae (threats).

NounEdit

menace f (plural menacis)

  1. threat, menace

Related termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

menace

  1. Alternative form of manacen

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

menace

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of menazar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of menazar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of menazar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of menazar.