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EnglishEdit

 
A sheet of mica

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin mīca (grain, crumb).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mica (countable and uncountable, plural micas)

  1. (mineralogy) Any of a group of hydrous aluminosilicate minerals characterized by highly perfect cleavage, so that they readily separate into very thin leaves, more or less elastic.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Occitan [Term?] (compare Occitan mica), from Vulgar Latin *micca, variant of Latin mīca, from Proto-Italic *smīkā, from Proto-Indo-European *smeyg- (small, thin, delicate).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mica f (plural miques)

  1. a bit, a small piece

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Latin mīca.

NounEdit

mica f (plural miques)

  1. (mineralogy) mica

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin mīca.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

mica f (plural micas)

  1. (mineralogy) mica

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin mīca.

NounEdit

mica f (uncountable)

  1. (mineralogy) mica

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin mīca, from Proto-Italic *smīkā, from Proto-Indo-European *smeyg- (small, thin, delicate).

NounEdit

mica f (plural miche)

  1. (archaic or literary) breadcrumb
  2. (by extension) bit, morsel
    Synonym: minuzzolo
Related termsEdit

AdverbEdit

mica

  1. (colloquial) not
    Mica male!Not bad!
  2. (colloquial) hardly, you know
    Mica sono stupido
    I’m hardly stupid; I’m not stupid, you know
  3. (colloquial) bit
    Non è mica cambiatoIt hasn't changed one bit
  4. (colloquial) at all
    Non costa mica moltoIt is not at all expensive
  5. (colloquial) by any chance
    Non hai mica trovato il mio portafoglio?
    Have you seen my wallet by any chance?

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Latin mīca, the same source as the above.

NounEdit

mica f (plural miche)

  1. (mineralogy) mica (mineral)

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *smīkā, from Proto-Indo-European *smeyg- (small, thin, delicate), related to Old English smicor (beauteous, beautiful, elegant, fair, fine, tasteful). More at smicker.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mīca f (genitive mīcae); first declension

  1. crumb, morsel, grain
  2. (New Latin, mineralogy) mica

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mīca mīcae
Genitive mīcae mīcārum
Dative mīcae mīcīs
Accusative mīcam mīcās
Ablative mīcā mīcīs
Vocative mīca mīcae

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Eastern Romance:
    • Romanian: mică
  • Italian: mica
  • Old French: mie
  • Old Portuguese: miga
  • Old Spanish: miga
  • English: mica
  • French: mica
  • Galician: mica
  • Portuguese: mica
  • Spanish: mica
  • Vulgar Latin: *micca

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin mīca. Compare the inherited doublet miga.

NounEdit

mica f (plural micas)

  1. (mineralogy) mica (hydrous aluminosilicate mineral)

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

mica

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of micar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of micar

RomanianEdit

SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin mīca. Compare the inherited doublet miga.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mica f (plural micas)

  1. (mineralogy) mica

Related termsEdit