modulate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin modulatus, past participle of modulari (to measure, regulate, modulate), from modulus (measure); see modulus. Compare module. Surface etymology: module +‎ -ate

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɑː.dʒə.ˌleɪt/

VerbEdit

modulate (third-person singular simple present modulates, present participle modulating, simple past and past participle modulated)

  1. (transitive) To regulate, adjust or adapt
  2. (transitive) To change the pitch, intensity or tone of one's voice or of a musical instrument
  3. (transitive, electronics) to vary the amplitude, frequency or phase of a carrier wave in proportion to the amplitude etc of a source wave (such as speech or music)
  4. (intransitive, music) to move from one key or tonality to another, especially by using a chord progression

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


EsperantoEdit

AdverbEdit

modulate

  1. present adverbial passive participle of moduli

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

modulate

  1. inflection of modulare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of modulato

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

modulāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of modulātus

ReferencesEdit

  • modulate in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • modulate in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • modulate in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette