U+33D6, ㏖
SQUARE MOL

[U+33D5]
CJK Compatibility
[U+33D7]

Translingual

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Symbol

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mol

  1. (chemistry) mole.

English

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology

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Borrowed from German Mol (1897).

Pronunciation

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  • (UK) IPA(key): /məʊl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /mol/, /moʊl/
  • Audio (US):(file)
  • Rhymes: -əʊl

Noun

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mol (plural mols)

  1. (chemistry, physics, dated) Alternative spelling of mole

Synonyms

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Anagrams

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Afrikaans

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Etymology

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From Dutch mol, from Middle Dutch mol, from Old Dutch mol, mul, from Proto-West Germanic *mol, from Proto-Germanic *mulaz.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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mol (plural molle, diminutive molletjie)

  1. mole, mammal of the family Talpidae; also used of some similar but not closely related mammals.

Usage notes

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  • Due to the abscence of "true" (talpid) moles in Africa, in everyday conversation the term may more commonly be applied to African mammals similar but not closely related to moles, such as golden moles and blesmols.

Derived terms

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Blagar

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Noun

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mol

  1. banana

References

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Breton

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Etymology

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From German Mol.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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mol m (plural moloù)

  1. (physics) mole

Catalan

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Verb

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mol

  1. inflection of moldre:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Czech

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Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈmol]
  • Hyphenation: mol

Etymology 1

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Inherited from Proto-Slavic *moľь.

Noun

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mol m anim

  1. a moth belonging to the family Tineidae; a fungus moth
Declension
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See also
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Etymology 2

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Noun

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mol m inan

  1. mole (SI unit of measure)
Declension
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Further reading

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  • mol in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • mol in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • mol in Internetová jazyková příručka

Danish

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Etymology 1

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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mol

  1. mole (unit of amount of substance)
Declension
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Etymology 2

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From German Moll, from Latin mollis (soft).

Noun

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mol

  1. (music) minor
    Coordinate term: dur
    • 2014, Ulrik Spang-Hanssen, Musikken imellem noderne: Swing i klassisk musik, ISD LLC, →ISBN:
      Alfred Cortots indspilning af Chopins vals i a-mol; ...
      Alfred Cortot's recording of Chopin's waltz in A minor; ...

Dutch

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Een mol. — A mole. (Talpa europaea)
 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle Dutch mol, from Old Dutch mol, mul, from Proto-West Germanic *mol, from Proto-Germanic *mulaz.

Noun

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mol m (plural mollen, diminutive molletje n)

  1. A mole, any insectivore of the family Talpidae.
  2. A European mole, Talpa europaea.
  3. A mole, an infiltrator, an infiltrant.
    Synonym: infiltrant
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Borrowed from French mol.

Noun

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mol f (plural mollen)

  1. (music) flat (musical note)
Descendants
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  • Indonesian: mol

Etymology 3

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Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Borrowed from German Mol.

Noun

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mol c (uncountable)

  1. (chemistry) A mole (unit of chemical quantity).
Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • Indonesian: mol

Anagrams

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Franco-Provençal

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Noun

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mol (Old Lyonnais)

  1. Alternative form of mul (male mule)

References

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French

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Pronunciation

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Adjective

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mol

  1. form of mou used in the masculine singular before a vowel sound

Further reading

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Friulian

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Etymology

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From Latin mollis.

Adjective

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mol

  1. soft
  2. flabby
  3. flexible

Galician

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Etymology 1

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From Old Galician-Portuguese mole, from Latin mollis (soft, weak).

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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mol m or f (plural moles)

  1. soft
    • 1409, G. Pérez Barcala, editor, A tradución galega do "Liber de medicina equorum" de Joradanus Ruffus, Santiago de Compostela: USC, page 172:
      filla o vinagre ben forte e a greda alva muda et pouco de sal ben mundo, e amasa todo moi ben ata que se faça ende ũa pasta mole
      take a strong vinegar and ground white clay and a little salt, finely ground, and mix very well everything till it becames a soft paste
  2. flexible, pliant
  3. weak, lacking strength
  4. (informal, dated) wine (from viño mol, "soft wine")
    • 1421, Margot Sponer (ed.), "Documentos antiguos de Galicia", in Anuari de l'Oficina Románica de Lingüística i Literatura, 7, page 60:
      douſ canadoσ de bjnõ mole aa bica do lagar por la medida de Monforte
      two canados [64 liters] of soft wine in the winery, as they are measured in Monforte
Antonyms
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  • (antonym(s) of soft): duro
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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From German Mol.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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mol m (plural moles)

  1. (chemistry, physics) mole (in the International System of Units, the base unit of amount of substance; the amount of substance of a system which contains as many elementary entities as there are atoms in 0.012 kg of carbon-12)

References

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  • Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja, Ana Isabel Boullón Agrelo (20062022) “mole”, in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • Xavier Varela Barreiro, Xavier Gómez Guinovart (20062018) “mole”, in Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • mol” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • mol” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • mol” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Indonesian

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Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Borrowed from Dutch mol, from German Mol.[1] Compare to Malay mol.

Noun

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mol (plural mol-mol, first-person possessive molku, second-person possessive molmu, third-person possessive molnya)

  1. (chemistry) A mole (unit of chemical quantity).
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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Dutch mol, from French mol, mou, from Old French mol, from Latin mollem.[2]

Noun

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mol (plural mol-mol, first-person possessive molku, second-person possessive molmu, third-person possessive molnya)

  1. (music) flat (musical note)
    Synonym: flat (Standard Malay)
Derived terms
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References

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  1. ^ Nicoline van der Sijs (2010) Nederlandse woorden wereldwijd [Dutch words worldwide]‎[1], Den Haag: Sdu Uitgevers, →ISBN, →OCLC
  2. ^ Nicoline van der Sijs (2010) Nederlandse woorden wereldwijd [Dutch words worldwide]‎[2], Den Haag: Sdu Uitgevers, →ISBN, →OCLC

Further reading

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Irish

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle Irish molaid, from Old Irish molaidir,[2] from Proto-Celtic *molātor. Cognate with Scottish Gaelic mol, Manx moyl.

Verb

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mol (present analytic molann, future analytic molfaidh, verbal noun moladh, past participle molta)

  1. to commend, nominate, propose, praise, recommend, suggest
    Mhol mo mhúinteoir mé.
    My teacher praised me.
Conjugation
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Derived terms
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Further reading

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Etymology 2

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From Old Irish mol (axle).[3]

Noun

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mol m (genitive singular moil, nominative plural moil)

  1. hub (center part of wheel), nave
    mol rothanave or hub of a wheel
  2. (transport) hub (point where many routes meet)
  3. (networking) hub (computer networking device)
  4. (mechanics) boss (projection in centre of shield; protrusion)
    mol liáinboss of a propeller
  5. (geography) pole (of the earth)
  6. (rotating) shaft (any long, thin object)
    mol muilinnshaft of a millstone
  7. (mechanical engineering) spindle (rotary axis of a machine tool or power tool)
  8. newel (central pillar of staircase)
    mol staighrenewel of a staircase
  9. top, protuberant part
    mol uibhetop of an egg
    mol sléibhea mountain top
    ar mhol a dhá ghlúnon his bended knees (literally, “on the protuberant parts of his two knees”)
Declension
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Derived terms
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Further reading

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Mutation

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Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
mol mhol not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

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  1. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, § 203, page 78
  2. ^ Gregory Toner, Sharon Arbuthnot, Máire Ní Mhaonaigh, Marie-Luise Theuerkauf, Dagmar Wodtko, editors (2019), “molaid to praise”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  3. ^ Gregory Toner, Sharon Arbuthnot, Máire Ní Mhaonaigh, Marie-Luise Theuerkauf, Dagmar Wodtko, editors (2019), “1 mol axle”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Lote

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Numeral

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mol

  1. three

References

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Lower Sorbian

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Noun

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mol m animal

  1. Superseded spelling of mól.

Declension

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Luxembourgish

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Pronunciation

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Adverb

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mol

  1. times (indicating multiplication of two numbers)
    dräi mol dräi ass néng
    three times three is nine

Verb

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mol

  1. second-person singular imperative of molen

Middle Dutch

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Etymology

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

From Proto-Germanic *mulaz, *mulhaz (mole, salamander), from Proto-Indo-European *molg-, *molk- (slug, salamander), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)melw- (to grind, crush, beat). Cognate with North Frisian mull (mole), Saterland Frisian molle (mole), Low German Mol, Mul (mole), German Molch (salamander, newt), Old Russian смолжь (smolžʹ, snail), Czech mlž (clam).

Noun

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mol m

  1. mole (animal)

Inflection

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This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

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Further reading

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Middle English

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Noun

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mol

  1. Alternative form of molle (rubbish)

Mòcheno

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Etymology

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From Middle High German māl, from Old High German māl, from Proto-West Germanic *māl, from Proto-Germanic *mēlą (measurement; time; meal). Cognate with German Mal, Mahl, English meal.

Noun

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mol n

  1. meal
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References

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Norwegian Bokmål

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Alternative forms

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Verb

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mol

  1. simple past of male (Etymology 2)

Norwegian Nynorsk

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Etymology 1

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From German Mol, a clipping of Gramm-Molekül.[1]

Noun

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mol n (definite singular molet, indefinite plural mol, definite plural mola)

  1. (chemistry, physics) mole
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Etymology 2

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From Old Norse mǫl f.[1]

Alternative forms

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  • mòl (alternative spelling)

Pronunciation

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Noun

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mol m (definite singular molen, indefinite plural molar, definite plural molane)

  1. a bank of gravel beach
  2. hard sand found under soil
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Etymology 3

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Compare mole, and Icelandic mol (crushing).

Noun

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mol f (definite singular mola, indefinite plural moler, definite plural molene)

  1. small pieces
  2. food waste, fish waste

Etymology 4

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Compare Swedish moln (cloud).[1]

Alternative forms

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  • mòl (alternative spelling)

Pronunciation

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Noun

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mol f (definite singular mola, uncountable)

  1. (collective) small and spread-out clouds

Etymology 5

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From Old Norse mǫlr (moth), in reference to the way in which they grind things down by eating.[1]

Noun

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mol m (definite singular molen, indefinite plural molar, definite plural molane)

  1. Alternative spelling of mòl, (pre-2012) alternative form of møll

Etymology 6

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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mol

  1. past of mala

Etymology 7

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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mol

  1. imperative of mola

References

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  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 “mol” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Anagrams

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Old Irish

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Etymology

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From Proto-Celtic *molos, from Proto-Indo-European *molós, from *melh₂- (to grind) +‎ *-ós (agent suffix).

Noun

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mol m (genitive muil)

  1. shaft of a mill

Inflection

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Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative mol molL muilL
Vocative muil molL muluH
Accusative molN molL muluH
Genitive muilL mol molN
Dative mulL molaib molaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Mutation

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Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
mol
also mmol after a proclitic
ending in a vowel
mol
pronounced with /β̃(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading

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Polish

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Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Borrowed from English mole.

Noun

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mol m inan (related adjective molowy or molalny)

  1. (chemistry, physics) mole (unit of amount)
  2. (chemistry, physics) gram molecule (amount of a compound whose mass in grams is that of its molecular weight)
    Synonym: gramocząsteczka
Declension
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Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

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mol n

  1. genitive plural of molo

Further reading

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  • mol in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • mol in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

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Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Borrowed from German Mol (mole), shortened form of Molekulargewicht (molecular weight).

Pronunciation

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  • Rhymes: (Portugal) -ɔl, (Brazil) -ɔw
  • Hyphenation: mol

Noun

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mol m (plural mols or moles) (Brazilian spelling)

  1. mole (unit of amount)

Usage notes

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In Portugal, mol is used to designate solely the symbol mol.

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Romanian

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Etymology 1

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Borrowed from Romani mol (wine).

Noun

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mol n (plural moluri)

  1. (slang) wine
Declension
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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from German Mol.

Noun

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mol m (plural moli)

  1. (chemistry) mole (unit)
Declension
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Etymology 3

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Borrowed from French môle.

Noun

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mol n (plural moluri)

  1. breakwater, mole, groyne
Declension
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Scottish Gaelic

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle Irish molaid, from Old Irish molaidir, from Proto-Celtic *molātor. Cognate with Irish mol, Manx moyl.

Verb

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mol (past mhol, future molaidh, verbal noun moladh, past participle molta)

  1. praise
  2. recommend
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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From Old Norse möl (gravel).

Noun

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mol m (genitive singular moil, plural molan)

  1. shingly beach

Etymology 3

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From English mole.

Noun

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mol m (genitive singular moil, plural molaichean)

  1. mole (structure)

Serbo-Croatian

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Italian molo.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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mȏl m (Cyrillic spelling мо̑л)

  1. dock, pier (for ships)

Declension

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Further reading

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  • mol” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Spanish

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Etymology 1

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Shortening of molécula

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈmol/ [ˈmol]
  • Rhymes: -ol
  • Syllabification: mol

Noun

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mol m (plural moles)

  1. mole (unit)
    Synonym: molécula gramo

Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Guanche [Term?].

Noun

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mol m (plural moles)

  1. (Canarian) Artemisia thuscula
    Synonyms: incienso canario, ajenjo de Canarias

Further reading

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Swedish

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Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

Adverb

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mol (not comparable)

  1. (in some expressions and compounds) completely
    mol allena
    all alone

Noun

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mol c

  1. (chemistry, physics) mole (unit of amount of substance)

Declension

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Declension of mol 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative mol molen mol molen
Genitive mols molens mols molens

References

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Uzbek

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Arabic مَال (māl).

Noun

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mol (plural mollar)

  1. livestock
  2. property, possessions

Declension

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Vietnamese

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Noun

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mol

  1. (chemistry, physics) a mole

Usage notes

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  • Always pronounced with a final /n/ (despite this recommended spelling in textbooks), even in southern dialects.

Welsh

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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mol

  1. nasal mutation of of bol

Yurok

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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mol

  1. dung