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See also: Monger

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English mongere, mangere, from Old English mangere (merchant, trader, dealer), from Old English mangian (to trade, to traffic) from Proto-Germanic *mangōną, from Latin mango "dealer, trader", from Greek 'manganon' "contrivance, means of enchantment", from Proto-Indo-European *mang "to embellish, dress, trim"

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

monger (plural mongers)

  1. (chiefly in combination) A dealer in a specific commodity.
    costermonger, fishmonger, ironmonger
    • 2005, Los Angeles Magazine (volume 50, number 11, page 111)
      For the freshest wild catch, ask your monger when the fish are running.
  2. (in combination) A person promoting something undesirable.
    warmonger, sleazemonger, scaremonger
  3. A small merchant vessel.
    In The Seaman's Manual (1790), by Lt. Robert Wilson (RN), a monger is defined as "a small sea-vessel used by fishermen."
  4. Clipping of whoremonger.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

monger (third-person singular simple present mongers, present participle mongering, simple past and past participle mongered)

  1. (transitive, Britain) To sell or peddle something
  2. (in combination) To promote something undesirable.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit