motive

See also: Motive

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

Middle English motif, from Anglo-Norman motif, Middle French motif, and their source, Late Latin motivum (motive, moving cause), neuter of motivus (serving to move).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

motive (plural motives)

  1. (obsolete) An idea or communication that makes one want to act, especially from spiritual sources; a divine prompting. [14th-17th c.]
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, III.2.1.ii:
      there's something in a woman beyond all human delight; a magnetic virtue, a charming quality, an occult and powerful motive.
  2. An incentive to act in a particular way; a reason or emotion that makes one want to do something; anything that prompts a choice of action. [from 15th c.]
    • 1947, Malcolm Lowry, Under the Volcano:
      Many of them at first seemed kind to him, but it turned out their motives were not entirely altruistic.
  3. (obsolete, rare) A limb or other bodily organ that can move. [15th-17th c.]
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  4. (law) Something which causes someone to want to commit a crime; a reason for criminal behaviour. [from 18th c.]
    What would his motive be for burning down the cottage?
    No-one could understand why she had hidden the shovel; her motives were obscure at best.
    • 1931, Francis Beeding, chapter 10/6, Death Walks in Eastrepps[1]:
      “Why should Eldridge commit murder? [] There was only one possible motive—namely, he wished to avoid detection as James Selby of Anaconda Ltd. []
  5. (architecture, fine arts) A motif. [from 19th c.]
  6. (music) A motif; a theme or subject, especially one that is central to the work or often repeated. [from 19th c.]
    If you listen carefully, you can hear the flutes mimicking the cello motive.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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VerbEdit

motive (third-person singular simple present motives, present participle motiving, simple past and past participle motived)

  1. (transitive) To prompt or incite by a motive or motives; to move.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

motive (not comparable)

  1. Causing motion; having power to move, or tending to move; as, a motive argument; motive power.
    • 1658, Sir Thomas Browne, The Garden of Cyrus, Folio Society 2007, p. 195:
      In the motive parts of animals may be discovered mutuall proportions; not only in those of Quadrupeds, but in the thigh-bone, legge, foot-bone, and claws of Birds.
  2. Relating to motion and/or to its cause

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

motive

  1. first-person singular present indicative of motiver
  2. third-person singular present indicative of motiver
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of motiver
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of motiver
  5. second-person singular imperative of motiver

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mōtive

  1. vocative masculine singular of mōtivus

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

motive

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of motivar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of motivar
  3. first-person singular imperative of motivar
  4. third-person singular imperative of motivar

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

motive

  1. plural form of motiv

Serbo-CroatianEdit

NounEdit

motive (Cyrillic spelling мотиве)

  1. accusative plural of motiv
  2. vocative singular of motiv

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

motive

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of motivar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of motivar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of motivar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of motivar.
Last modified on 2 April 2014, at 18:07