See also: Moult

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English mouten, from Old English *mutian (cf. bemutian), from Latin mūtō, mūtāre. Doublet of mute.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

moult (plural moults)

  1. The process of shedding or losing a covering of fur, feathers or skin etc.
    Some birds change colour during their winter moult.
  2. The skin or feathers cast off during the process of moulting.
    Synonym: exuvia

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

moult (third-person singular simple present moults, present participle moulting, simple past and past participle moulted)

  1. (intransitive) To shed or lose a covering of hair or fur, feathers, skin, horns, etc, and replace it with a fresh one.
    Synonyms: shed, slough
  2. (transitive) To shed in such a manner.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French moult, from Old French molt, mout, mult, from Latin multus, from Proto-Indo-European *ml̥tos (crumbled, crumpled, past passive participle). After having largely disappeared from standard spoken language, where it was replaced by beaucoup, the adjective form (pronounced /mult/) is now occasionally heard again.

PronunciationEdit

  • (traditional) IPA(key): /mu/
  • (spelling pronunciation) IPA(key): /mult/, /mul/
    • (file)
  • Homophones: mou, mous

AdjectiveEdit

moult (feminine singular moulte, masculine plural moults, feminine plural moultes)

  1. (formerly archaic or regional) many; a lot of
    Synonym: beaucoup

AdverbEdit

moult

  1. (archaic or regional) much; a lot

Usage notesEdit

Used both as invariable and variable adjective:

Après moult hésitations, il prit cette décision. (invariable)
After much hesitation he made this decision.
Et, pour finir, moulte chose / Blanche et noire, effet et cause [] (variable)[1]
And, to finish, many a thing / White and black, effect and cause []

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Paul Verlaine (1896) , “Prologue”, in Chair, published 1901

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • mlt (manuscript abbreviation)

EtymologyEdit

From Old French molt, mout, from Latin multus.

AdverbEdit

moult

  1. much; a lot

DescendantsEdit

  • French: moult