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EnglishEdit

 
A cicada moulting.
 
A cockroach moulting.
 
A cicada molting.

Alternative formsEdit

  • molt (American English)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English mouten, from Old English *mutian (cf. bemutian), from Latin mūtō, mūtāre.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

moult (plural moults)

  1. The process of shedding or losing a covering of fur, feathers or skin etc.
    Some birds change colour during their winter moult.
  2. The skin or feathers cast off during the process of moulting.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

moult (third-person singular simple present moults, present participle moulting, simple past and past participle moulted)

  1. (intransitive) To shed or lose a covering of hair or fur, feathers, skin, horns, etc, and replace it with a fresh one.
  2. (transitive) To shed in such a manner.

TranslationsEdit



FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French moult, from Old French molt, mout, mult, from Latin multus, from Proto-Indo-European *ml̥tos (crumbled, crumpled, past passive participle). Has largely disappeared from spoken language, only preserved in some dialects, and replaced by beaucoup.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

moult

  1. (archaic, regional) much; a lot

AdjectiveEdit

moult (feminine singular moulte, masculine plural moults, feminine plural moultes)

  1. (archaic, regional) many; a lot of
    Synonyms: beaucoup

Usage notesEdit

Used both as invariable and variable adjective:

Après moult hésitations, il prit cette décision. (invariable)
After many hesitations he took the decision.
Et, pour finir, moulte chose / Blanche et noire, effet et cause [] (variable)[1]
And, to finish, many a thing / White and black, effect and cause []

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Paul Verlaine (1896), “Prologue”, in Chair, published 1901

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • mlt (manuscript abbreviation)

EtymologyEdit

From Old French molt, mout, from Latin multus.

AdverbEdit

moult

  1. much; a lot

Derived termsEdit