EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French < Old French < Latin nātus, perfect active participle of nāscor (I am born). Doublet of nada.

AdjectiveEdit

(not comparable)

  1. (rare, usually italicised) Used to specify the original name of a man.
    Coordinate terms: nés, née, nées
    Sting, Gordon Sumner

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Afrikaans nee.

ParticleEdit

  1. (South Africa) Yeah? not so? hey?
    so I saw this girl , and I wanted to talk to her...

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French , from Latin nātus, from earlier gnātus, from Proto-Italic *gnātos, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵn̥h₁tós (begotten, produced), derived from the root *ǵenh₁- (to beget, give birth).

ParticipleEdit

(feminine singular née, masculine plural nés, feminine plural nées)

  1. past participle of naître

Etymology 2Edit

Hispanic pronunciation.

ParticleEdit

  1. (nonstandard) Alternative form of ne

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Clipping of nézd, the second-person singular subjunctive definite of néz (to look).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈneː]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -neː

InterjectionEdit

  1. (folksy) look!, see! (expressing surprise or wanting to get attention)

See alsoEdit

  • -né (Mrs, wife of, suffix)

Further readingEdit

  • (“look!”): in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (regional form of the interjection ne): , usually as part of the phrase Ne te ne, ne te né, or né te né!, redirecting to (3): ne in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse , from Proto-Germanic *nehw.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

  1. nor (used with hvorki meaning "neither")
    Ég er hvorki svangur þyrstur.
    I'm neither hungry nor thirsty.
    Maðurinn hennar er hvorki klár hnyttinn.
    Her husband is neither smart nor witty.

Derived termsEdit


Isthmus ZapotecEdit

PrepositionEdit

  1. with

ItalianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (misspelling)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nec.[1]

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

  1. nor
  2. neither...nor
    • 2015, “Gaetano”, in Mainstream, performed by Calcutta:
      Volevo avere dei figli, troppi pochi, tardi domani
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  3. either...or

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Angelo Prati, "Vocabolario Etimologico Italiano", Torino, 1951; headword

LashiEdit

EtymologyEdit

Related to nang (you).

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

  1. thy, your (singular)

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[1], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis)

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

(Zhuyin ㄋㄜˊ)

  1. Pinyin transcription of
  2. Pinyin transcription of

NormanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French noi and its variants, from Latin nix, nivem.

NounEdit

 f (uncountable)

  1. (Jersey) snow
Alternative formsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

AdjectiveEdit

 m

  1. Alternative form of nièr

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nātus.

VerbEdit

(oblique and nominative feminine singular nee)

  1. past participle of naistre

DescendantsEdit

  • French:

Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Norse ᚾᛁ (ni), from Proto-Germanic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne (not). Cognate with Gothic 𐌽𐌹 (ni), among others.

ParticleEdit

  1. (archaic) not
    Synonyms: eigi, ekki

Usage notesEdit

As can be seen in the Vǫluspá line Ǫnd þau átto, óð þau hǫfðo (Spirit they possessed not, sense they had not), né precedes the verb it modifies. This is unlike the synonyms eigi and ekki, which follow it (Ek veit eigi = I know not), but just like the cognates in the other old Germanic languages.

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *nehw (nor), cognate with Gothic 𐌽𐌹𐌷 (nih). From *ne (not) +‎ *-hw (and). The simple negation Proto-Norse ᚾᛁ (ni) has disappeared in the later Scandinavian languages, including Classical Old Norse (although it is seen in the oldest poems, and in fossilized forms like nǫkkurr, neinn). It is found in the other older Germanic languages: Old English ne, Old Frisian ne, ni, Old Saxon ne, ni, Old Dutch ne, Old High German ni, Gothic 𐌽𐌹 (ni).

ConjunctionEdit

  1. nor

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Contraction of não é.

PronunciationEdit

ContractionEdit

né?

  1. (colloquial, interrogatory) Contraction of não é. Used as a tag question to ask for someone's opinion: isn't it (so); innit; right
    Você já comeu, ?
    You have already eaten, right?
  2. (colloquial, often interrogatory) Expresses that something is obvious: duh; obviously
    Do que é feito um anel de diamante? De diamantes, né?!
    What a diamond ring is made of? Diamonds, obviously!

VenetianEdit

ConjunctionEdit

  1. neither, nor

AdverbEdit

  1. from

VietnameseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

  1. (colloquial) to avoid; to dodge

Derived termsEdit

Derived terms