Cuiba edit

Noun edit

nae

  1. tree

Irish edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Irish (boat, ship), from Old Irish nau,[1] from Proto-Celtic *nāwā, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂us. Cognate with Latin navis and Ancient Greek ναῦς (naûs).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nae f (genitive singular nae, nominative plural naetha)

  1. boat

Declension edit

Synonyms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “2 nó, noe”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Further reading edit

Khumi Chin edit

Noun edit

nae

  1. room, chamber

Maia edit

Pronoun edit

nae

  1. (in the plural) you

Scots edit

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

nae

  1. Doric form of na (not)
    That's nae richt!
    That's not right!

Determiner edit

nae

  1. (most Scots dialects) no
    There's nae breid left!
    There's no bread left!

Conjunction edit

nae

  1. (Doric) not

Interjection edit

nae

  1. Alternative form of na (no)

Yola edit

Determiner edit

nae

  1. Alternative form of na (no)
    • 1867, CONGRATULATORY ADDRESS IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 116, lines 4-6:
      Yer name var zetch avancet avare ye, e'en a dicke var hye, arent whilke ye brine o'zea an ye craggès o'noghanes cazed nae balke.
      Your fame for such came before you even into this retired spot, to which neither the waters of the sea below nor the mountains above caused any impediment.

References edit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 116

Zhuang edit

Etymology edit

Cognate with Shan ၼၢႆး (náai, dew; mist), Ahom 𑜃𑜩 (nay, dew) or 𑜃𑜩𑜐𑜫 (nayñ), Bouyei nail.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nae (Sawndip forms or 𭛎, 1957–1982 spelling nəi)

  1. snow
    Synonym: (dialectal) siet