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EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek νόησις (nóēsis, concept”, “idea”, “intelligence”, “understanding), from νοεῖν (noeîn, to intend”, “to perceive”, “to see”, “to understand) (from νοῦς (noûs, mind”, “thought), from νόος (nóos)) + -σις (-sis), suffix forming nouns of action.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

noesis (countable and uncountable, plural noeses)[1]

  1. (in psychology) cognition, the functioning of intellect.
  2. (in Greek philosophy) the exercise of reason.
  3. (in metaphysical philosophy) the consciousness component of Noetic Theory, which concerns the duality of noesis and noema.
    • 2003, Denis Fisette, Husserl's Logical Investigations Reconsidered
      Husserl calls the noesis the meaning-giving element of the act, and the noema he calls the meaning given in the act."

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ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 noesis, n.” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [Draft revision; June 2008]

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