English edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French nonchalant, from Old French nonchaloir (to be unconcerned), from non- (not) +‎ chaloir (to have concern for), from Latin non (not) +‎ calēre (to be warm).

Pronunciation edit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈnɒn.ʃəl.ənt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌnɑn.ʃəˈlɑnt/
  • (file)
  • (file)

Adjective edit

nonchalant (comparative more nonchalant, superlative most nonchalant)

  1. Casually calm and relaxed.
    We handled the whole frenetic situation with a nonchalant attitude.
    • 1951 October, R. S. McNaught, “Lines of Approach”, in Railway Magazine, page 703:
      On the other hand, to arrive after dusk, when the multitude of garish little public-houses are lit up, giving glimpses of crowded jostling bars and taprooms, is an introduction to a fine city well calculated to affect even the most nonchalant.
  2. Indifferent; unconcerned; behaving as if detached.
    He is far too nonchalant about such a serious matter.

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Danish edit

Etymology edit

From French nonchalant.

Adjective edit

nonchalant

  1. nonchalant, offhand

Inflection edit

Inflection of nonchalant
Positive Comparative Superlative
Indefinte common singular nonchalant 2
Indefinite neuter singular nonchalant 2
Plural nonchalante 2
Definite attributive1 nonchalante
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

Adverb edit

nonchalant

  1. nonchalantly, offhandedly

Further reading edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French nonchalant.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˌnɔn.ʃaːˈlɑnt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: non‧cha‧lant
  • Rhymes: -ɑnt

Adjective edit

nonchalant (comparative nonchalanter, superlative nonchalantst)

  1. careless, showing no interest or effort

Inflection edit

Declension of nonchalant
uninflected nonchalant
inflected nonchalante
comparative nonchalanter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial nonchalant nonchalanter het nonchalantst
het nonchalantste
indefinite m./f. sing. nonchalante nonchalantere nonchalantste
n. sing. nonchalant nonchalanter nonchalantste
plural nonchalante nonchalantere nonchalantste
definite nonchalante nonchalantere nonchalantste
partitive nonchalants nonchalanters

Related terms edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Present participle of Old French nonchaloir (to have no importance), from non +‎ chaloir, equivalent to Latin non (not) +‎ calēre (to be warm).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

nonchalant (feminine nonchalante, masculine plural nonchalants, feminine plural nonchalantes)

  1. Marked by a lack of vivacity, vigour, liveliness; slow-moving; indolent
  2. Cool, relaxed

Usage notes edit

  • Although French nonchalant is usually appropriate where the English one is used, its meaning is different.

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

Further reading edit

German edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French nonchalant, from Old French nonchaloir, from Latin non (not) +‎ calēre (to be warm).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˌnɔ̃ʃaˈlɑ̃ː], [ˌnɔ̃ʃaˈlant]
  • (file)

Adjective edit

nonchalant (strong nominative masculine singular nonchalanter, comparative nonchalanter, superlative am nonchalantesten)

  1. nonchalant

Declension edit

Further reading edit

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From French nonchalant.

Adjective edit

nonchalant (indefinite singular nonchalant, definite singular and plural nonchalante)

  1. nonchalant

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From French nonchalant.

Adjective edit

nonchalant (indefinite singular nonchalant, definite singular and plural nonchalante)

  1. nonchalant

References edit