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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French nonchalant, from Old French nonchaloir (to be unconcerned), from non- (not) + chaloir (to have concern for), from Latin non (not) + calēre (to be warm).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈnɒn.ʃəl.ənt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌnɑn.ʃəˈlɑnt/
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AdjectiveEdit

nonchalant (comparative more nonchalant, superlative most nonchalant)

  1. Casually calm and relaxed.
    We handled the whole frenetic situation with a nonchalant attitude.
  2. Indifferent; unconcerned; behaving as if detached.
    He is far too nonchalant about such a serious matter.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French nonchalant.

AdjectiveEdit

nonchalant

  1. nonchalant, offhand

InflectionEdit

Inflection of nonchalant
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular nonchalant 2
Neuter singular nonchalant 2
Plural nonchalante 2
Definite attributive1 nonchalante
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

AdverbEdit

nonchalant

  1. nonchalantly, offhandedly

DutchEdit

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Present participle of Old French nonchaloir (to have no importance), from non + chaloir, equivalent to Latin non (not) + calēre (to be warm).

AdjectiveEdit

nonchalant (feminine singular nonchalante, masculine plural nonchalants, feminine plural nonchalantes)

  1. Marked by a lack of vivacity, vigour, liveliness; slow-moving; indolent.
  2. Cool, relaxed

Usage notesEdit

  • Although French nonchalant is usually appropriate where the English one is used, its meaning is different.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French nonchalant, from Old French nonchaloir, from Latin non (not) + calēre (to be warm).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

nonchalant (comparative nonchalanter, superlative am nonchalantesten)

  1. nonchalant

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit