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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin obtundere (to dull", "deaden", "deafen), from ob- (see ob-) + tundere

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /əbˈtʌnd/, /ɒbˈtʌnd/
  • (US) IPA(key): /əbˈtənd/, /ɑbˈtʌnd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌnd

VerbEdit

obtund (third-person singular simple present obtunds, present participle obtunding, simple past and past participle obtunded)

  1. (transitive, chiefly medicine) To reduce the edge or effects of; to mitigate; to dull.
    • 1900, Martha M. Allen, Alcohol, a Dangerous and Unnecessary Medicine, p. 319:
      [] the use of alcoholic decoctions [] which are given as medicines to allay pain, obtund nerve sensibility, to cure the little sufferer of his vital manifestations []
    • 2008, Jerrold H. Levy, Kenichi A. Tanaka & Eric J. Okun, "Cardial Surgical Pharmacology", in Cardiac Surgery in the Adult, →ISBN, p. 103:
      Small doses of opioids are also useful in obtunding airway reflexes []

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