AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

VerbEdit

ocupar

  1. (transitive) to occupy

ReferencesEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin occupāre, present active infinitive of occupō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ocupar (first-person singular present ocupo, past participle ocupat)

  1. to occupy, to inhabit
  2. to fill, to take up (be in or hold a given place)
  3. to employ, to keep busy
  4. to occupy, to conquer

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin occupāre, present active infinitive of occupō.

VerbEdit

ocupar (first-person singular present indicative ocupo, past participle ocupado)

  1. to occupy (all senses)

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin occupāre, present active infinitive of occupō. Cognate with English occupy.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ocupar (first-person singular present ocupo, first-person singular preterite ocupé, past participle ocupado)

  1. (transitive) to occupy (to take or use space)
  2. (transitive) to occupy (to fill or hold a position)
    ocupar el puesto número ochoto be in eighth place
  3. (transitive) to occupy, to take up (time or space)
  4. (transitive) to occupy, to reside in
  5. (transitive) to employ (to hire to work for a job)
    Synonym: emplear
  6. (transitive, Latin America) to use
    Synonyms: usar, utilizar, emplear
  7. (transitive, intransitive, Central America) to need
    Synonym: necesitar
  8. (reflexive, with de) to look after (to watch or protect a person)
  9. (reflexive, with de) to take on (a responsibility)
    Synonym: encargarse

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin occupo, occupare. Compare Italian occupare.

VerbEdit

ocupar

  1. (transitive) to occupy

ConjugationEdit

  • Venetian conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.