on the whole

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

AdverbEdit

on the whole (not comparable)

  1. (idiomatic) For the most part; apart from some insignificant details.
    The language was wrong for the period, but, on the whole, I enjoyed the film.
    • 1849, Henry David Thoreau, A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers, Monday:
      Davis had a ball lodged in his body, and his right hand shot off; but on the whole, he seems to have been less damaged than his companion.
    • 1910, E. M. Forster, Howards End, ch. 5:
      [H]is class was near enough her own for its manners to vex her. But she found him interesting on the whole.
    • 2012 Jan. 18, Simon Shuster, "The Anti-Putin Movement: An Interview with the Blogger in Chief," Time (retrieved 18 August 2013):
      Both Maidan and Tahrir were peaceful. Maidan was absolutely peaceful, Tahrir saw some unrest but was still peaceful on the whole.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 01:19