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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ornatus, past participle of ornare (to equip, adorn).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ornate (comparative more ornate, superlative most ornate)

  1. Elaborately ornamented, often to excess.
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter V, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326:
      The house of Ruthven was a small but ultra-modern limestone affair, between Madison and Fifth ; []. As a matter of fact its narrow ornate façade presented not a single quiet space that the eyes might rest on after a tiring attempt to follow and codify the arabesques, foliations, and intricate vermiculations of what some disrespectfully dubbed as “near-aissance.”
  2. Flashy, flowery or showy
  3. Finely finished, as a style of composition.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

ornate (third-person singular simple present ornates, present participle ornating, simple past and past participle ornated)

  1. (obsolete) To adorn; to honour.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Latimer
      They may ornate and sanctify the name of God.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

ōrnāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of ōrnātus

ReferencesEdit