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EnglishEdit

 
An ostrich and chick (probably Struthio camelus australis)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English ostrich, ostriche, ostryche, ostrige, borrowed from Anglo-Norman ostrige and Old French ostruce, from Vulgar Latin *austruthio, from Latin avis (bird) + strūthiō (ostrich), from Ancient Greek στρουθίων (strouthíōn), or shortened from strūthiocamēlus, from Ancient Greek στρουθιοκάμηλος (strouthiokámēlos), from στρουθός (strouthós, sparrow) + κάμηλος (kámēlos, camel). Compare Spanish avestruz.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɒs.tɹɪt͡ʃ/, /ˈɒs.tɹɪd͡ʒ/; enPR: ŏs'trĭch, ŏs'trĭj
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɔs.tɹɪt͡ʃ/, /ˈɑs.tɹɪt͡ʃ/, /ˈɔs.tɹɪd͡ʒ/, /ˈɑs.tɹɪd͡ʒ/; enPR: ôs'trĭch, ŏs'trĭch, ôs'trĭj, ŏs'trĭj
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NounEdit

ostrich (plural ostriches)

  1. A large flightless bird (Struthio camelus) native to Africa.
  2. (figuratively) One who buries one's head in the sand instead of acknowledging problems

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman ostrige and Old French ostruce, from Vulgar Latin *austrūthiō.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɔstritʃ/, /ˈɔstridʒ/

NounEdit

ostrich (plural ostriches)

  1. ostrich (Struthio camelus)
  2. (rare) A goblet made of an ostrich egg.
  3. (rare, heraldry) A heraldic image of an ostrich.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: ostrich
  • Scots: ostriche (obsolete)

ReferencesEdit