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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French ouster, oustre, a nominalization of Anglo-Norman oustre (to oust).

NounEdit

ouster (plural ousters)

  1. (historical) A putting out of possession; dispossession; ejection.
  2. (property law) Action by a cotenant that prevents another cotenant from enjoying the use of jointly owned property.
  3. (now chiefly US) Specifically, the forceful removal of a politician or regime from power; coup.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

ouster (third-person singular simple present ousters, present participle oustering, simple past and past participle oustered)

  1. To oust.

Etymology 2Edit

oust +‎ -er

NounEdit

ouster (plural ousters)

  1. (Britain) Someone who ousts.

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

ouster

  1. (chiefly Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of oster

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-sts, *-stt are modified to z, st. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.