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EnglishEdit

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AdjectiveEdit

out of character ‎(comparative more out of character, superlative most out of character)

  1. (idiomatic) Inconsistent with one's personality, disposition, or usual expected behaviour.
    The burst of anger was out of character for the normally placid boy.
    • 2012 April 29, Nathan Rabin, “TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “Treehouse of Horror III” (season 4, episode 5; originally aired 10/29/1992)”, in (Please provide the title of the work)[1]:
      In “Treehouse Of Horror” episodes, the rules aren’t just different—they don’t even exist. If writers want Homer to kill Flanders or for a segment to end with a marriage between a woman and a giant ape, they can do so without worrying about continuity or consistency or fans griping that the gang is behaving out of character.
  2. (idiomatic, drama) Not in character; not successfully performing within the mindset of a given character in a theatrical performance. See also break character, drop character.
    I was out of character for most of the first act because those people in the third row wouldn't stop chatting.
  3. (idiomatic, drama, role-playing games) Not acting; not "on"; behaving within one's natural personality rather than that of a character, or taking actions entirely outside the fictional context.
    After watching him perform so energetically, it is a bit of a trip to hang out with him when he's out of character. In real life, he's really mellow.
    Susan asked the GM, out of character, whether she was able to sense magic in the room.

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

out of character ‎(comparative more out of character, superlative most out of character)

  1. (idiomatic) In a manner inconsistent with one's usual and expected personality or behavior.
  2. (idiomatic, drama, role-playing games) Away from the mindset, personality, or behavior assumed for a role that an actor is rehearsing or performing, or that a player is playing.
    He has the uncanny ability of getting in and out of character within a split second.
    The comedian stepped out of character to mug directly to the audience.

AntonymsEdit

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