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EnglishEdit

Prepositional phraseEdit

out of kilter

  1. (idiomatic) Disturbed; askew; out of order; not working or adjusted properly.
    • 17 June 2018, Barney Ronay, The Guardian, Mexico’s Hirving Lozano stuns world champions Germany for brilliant win:
      This was a champion team out of kilter, stung by what was arguably an act of disrespect to their opponents, a failure to appreciate their threat and the fine planning of Carlos Osorio, and never really able to regain its balance.
    • 1941 March, “AN AIRLINER CRACKS UP IN PINE WOODS NEAR ATLANTA AMD SEVEN PEOPLE DIE”, in Life:
      Snowstorms often knock the Government's Salt Lake radio range out of kilter.
    • 1851, Sojourner Truth and Frances Dana Barker Gage, Ain't I a Woman?:
      Well, children, where there is so much racket there must be something out of kilter. I think that 'twixt the negroes of the South and the women at the North, all talking about rights, the white men will be in a fix pretty soon.
    I stayed up late to watch a movie, and my entire sleeping schedule has been out of kilter ever since.

Usage notesEdit

Often used with throw, as in "an impact can throw the adjustment out of kilter".

Related termsEdit