overbear

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From over- +‎ bear.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

overbear (third-person singular simple present overbears, present participle overbearing, simple past overbore, past participle overborne)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To carry over. [10th-14th c.]
  2. (transitive) To push through by physical weight or strength; to overwhelm, overcome. [from 16th c.]
    • c. 1390, Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘The Wife of Bath's Tale’, The Canterbury Tales, Penguin Classics, p. 287:
      I attacked first and they were overborne, / Glad to apologize and even suing / Pardon for what they'd never thought of doing.
  3. (transitive) To prevail over; to dominate, overpower; to oppress. [from 16th c.]
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, V.11:
      It often fals, in course of common life, / That right long time is overborne of wrong […].
  4. (intransitive) To produce an overabundance of fruit. [from 18th c.]
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 01:52